Thanks so much Michelle. As far as getting EO recipes… I’m not aware of any NEW books out by any well-known aromatherapists, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t. I’m not an aromatherapist so I’m not in that circle too much. I get a lot of recipes from Vintage Remedies (Jessie Hawkins is an aromatherapist) and Aromahead (an aromatherapy school) as well as older books by respected aromatherapists and companies that sell quality essential oils. I know Plant Therapy, Eden Gardens, and Mountain Rose Herbs shares recipes from time to time. Good luck!!
If you’re reading this and live in an area that would be considered “modern” or “industrial,” there’s a 70% chance that you don’t get the sleep that you need every night. In America alone, an estimated 50 – 70 million people suffer from sleep disorders or sleep deprivation and we literally have an epidemic on our hands! What if I told you that using the best essential oils for sleep could help reverse this trend?
As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.
After testing your blend, if you like the scent and how it makes you feel, go with it. You can now make more of your blend, using larger amounts of oils, before bottling it up and labeling it. If you don’t like the scent or it doesn’t affect you the way you hoped it would, you can start the process over varying the amount of essential oils used or you can chose different oils all together.
All citrus oils are are produced by way of cold-pressing, or extracting, essential oils out of the rind of the fruit. I always advocate for organic citrus essential oils because they are sure to contain less pesticides and other chemical byproducts used in the agriculture of growing the plants. Spraying fruit trees against insects, viruses and other naturally occurring diseases leaves chemical residue on the rind of the fruits. Certainly, these chemicals must find their way into the essential oils product as well. I always purchase organic citrus oils. A beautiful variety of sweet orange essential oil is this one here by NOW essentials.
Essential oil blends are diluted differently depending upon a persons age and the use you have for it. For example, an infant would need a 1% dilution where an older child would do fine with a 2.5% dilution. Adults are usually around a 5% dilution. These dilutions would be for massage oils or therapeutic uses. For cleaning or air fresheners, you may use the 5% dilution or stronger… it just depends on where it’s being used and how.
Any idea’s on blends for autism? CBD oil I think is going to change everything, it’s taken away 95% of my autism symptoms and I’m going in public now. Also off all 5 synthetic prescription and testing different blends with frankencense, vanilla, lavendar, and peppermint I got. I like those but I would like some woody smells. I’m not sure, I just can’t afford to keep buying a new bottle at a time for $10.
You might also want to ensure that your diffuser looks great in your home by pairing it with items that mesh well in color and texture. Or you may want your beautiful diffuser to stand alone as a centerpiece. Whatever you choose to do, you’ll find that it doesn’t take much to ensure get the most out of your diffusers. Now… some essential oil diffuser recipes!
Hi Megan! I’m new to oils, and I’m looking specifically for oils that help with anxiety, depression, insomnia, and colds/flu. I have right now sweet orange, lemongrass, frankincense, tea tree, peppermint, rosemary, eucalyptus, and lavender. Could you offer some direction/advice on where to start with what I have? I would be using them by diffusing with a diffuser or using the steam from taking a shower if that helps. Thanks!
Middle notes are like the “ties that bind” only they are binding your other essential oils together into a harmonized blend. These are the oils that complete your blend by balancing the light top notes with the deep base notes. The aroma of middle notes lasts longer than those of top notes, but not as long as base notes. These oils can vary in consistency and are often derived from whole herbs and spices.

Thanks so much Michelle. As far as getting EO recipes… I’m not aware of any NEW books out by any well-known aromatherapists, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t. I’m not an aromatherapist so I’m not in that circle too much. I get a lot of recipes from Vintage Remedies (Jessie Hawkins is an aromatherapist) and Aromahead (an aromatherapy school) as well as older books by respected aromatherapists and companies that sell quality essential oils. I know Plant Therapy, Eden Gardens, and Mountain Rose Herbs shares recipes from time to time. Good luck!!


Vetiver essential oil is made from tall perennial grass plants growing natively in India. It is an essential oil base note and  therefore has a very calming, stabilizing, and grounding nature. Vetiver smells quite grassy and ‘strong’, so I have not had much luck using it on its own. However, together with Lavender, Sweet Orange, or both, it makes a fantastic sleep blend that you’re sure to come back to.


The use of essential oils for medicinal purposes has an ancient history, going back to early Egyptian, Chinese, and Roman societies. Ever hear of the Hippocratic Oath? That’s the ethical pledge taken by physicians for centuries (now, often taken by students upon graduation from medical school). It’s named for Greek physician, Hippocrates, who studied the effects of essential oils and was a proponent of their healing, health-promoting properties.
When you start your diffuser blend, please start conservatively. A small amount of essential oil can produce a significant aroma. Be careful to not overload the diffuser blend right when you start pouring your first drops into it. Sometimes, the essential oil bottle droppers release the oils quite quickly. Start with a low pouring angle so the oil drops don’t come out too quickly for you, and you can accurately stop the flow after 1-2 drops.

The whole article was really helpful! My girlfriend and I are currently trying to find ways to raise money so she can fund a research aimed to study and protect a species that is now endangered in our country but it has been very difficult as many people don’t feel concerned. We’re now trying to find other ideas and she came up with the idea of making candles. Mixing essential oils can be quite difficult when you’re not sure if they would blend together well, especially when you don’t already have them on hand… Our idea is to create candles made from organic soy wax, that could also double as massage candles (she already made some and it does wonders for the skin), and blend oils with natural scents that remind people of different environments where they can also find endangered species, since we plan on donating a percentage of the money to different non-profit organizations. We had some ideas but don’t know much about essential oils, and this article has been SO helpful and is already helping us with our list of mixes so we can create wonderful scents. All these tips will also help us get to a slightly less ”amateur” result so we can offer products with different depths and scents, that last longer. Thanks a lot!
First off though, and this is an always ALWAYS rule for me, NEVER ingest any essential oils. Regardless of what essential oil companies say, and what you may have heard around the internet, I still think there are serious health risks to ingesting essential oils, and I will soon write an article dedicated to just this topic. I never ingest any oils myself, my aromatherapy-certified friends agree, and I will never recommend this to you either. ALWAYS DILUTE essential oils with water (in a diffuser), or with a carrier oil (for topical application).
I really enjoy Lea’s website too! One thing I recently learned about the 3rd party testing she had done though, was it may not be very reliable. She chose a chemist in France who used outdated testing equipment simply because it was the cheapest. And although I greatly appreciate her knowledge, she gets very defensive and on the verge of rude at times in the comments. I also know she doesn’t appreciate learning that isn’t taught by a certified aroma therapist.
I was introduced to dottera oils 4 years ago. I have also used other oils for diffusing. There is a huge difference between oils in my opinion. Although various oil manufacturers claim to be 100% pure you can tell the difference as compared to dottera which has purity in scent. Many oils have carrier oils added to them so although they claim to be pure they are not. Also dottera oils are therapeutic grade and many can be ingested safely. I believe if you are going to inhale a substance it should be 100% pure with no additives. As a nurse I know this is important. Just my opinion.
Oh, lavender essential oil is great, and I’d definitely consider it a go-to oil. It’s an easy one for beginners to use, it’s mostly safe, and it has a lot of different uses. I didn’t exclude it from the list for any particular reason. I just went through and tried to select oils with different notes so people would have a good variety of EO choices when making their blends. Hope that answers your question!

Another thing I learned was about the whole “therapeutic” thing. I always thought that when an oil company claimed that their oil was “therapeutic grade” it meant that it could be used medicinal purposes, not just for aromatherapy purposes. I’m sure that’s true, but from what you, the article I just read, and other EO experts are saying, that isn’t true. Pure essential oils can be used for their “therapeutic” or medicinal qualities just like they can be used in aromatherapy. The term “therapeutic grade” means nothing. Eden’s Organic oils say 100% Pure Essential Oils on their bottles, but I think somewhere on their site it says therapeutic grade. I’m assuming many small companies like theirs are having to claim this in order to keep up with the bigger companies, whether it’s true or not. Either way, it doesn’t matter to me, but I did take that wording out of this post so that it’s more accurate!
If you’re reading this and live in an area that would be considered “modern” or “industrial,” there’s a 70% chance that you don’t get the sleep that you need every night. In America alone, an estimated 50 – 70 million people suffer from sleep disorders or sleep deprivation and we literally have an epidemic on our hands! What if I told you that using the best essential oils for sleep could help reverse this trend?

I would never recommend doing that. Diffusers are a great way to scent your home with the benefits of essential oils. The plastic in a cpap machine is more than likely not tested for oil use and can degrade over time. You do not want that doing through a tube directly into someone’s body. That’s a sure way to potentially get too much oil in your body and make you sick.


Essential oils can act by triggering the central nervous system and circulatory system to promote sleep in the body. To test these effects, an increasing amount of scientific studies have been conducted to evaluate their effectiveness on humans. The following are considered the best essential oils for sleep due to their sedative, calming or stress-reducing properties.


I personally deal with Restless Leg Syndrome. From the very first back surgery that I had, at the age of 8, I began experiencing RLS at nights.  Sometimes it would be so severe that I'd miss a ton of sleep. It wasn't until I found aromatherapy, that I found my answer to my problem. This blend is one of the first essential oil blends that I created, along with Headcase (my headache and sinus blend), Medicine Woman (my anti-germ/immune boosting blend), and Don't Worry Be Happy (my anti-anxiety and stress blend). To use this blend for RLS, simply roll onto legs and feet before bed and/or at the time of a flare-up, and massage in. It usually takes anywhere from instantly, up to ten minutes for this blend to begin working for me.
CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
Hypnotic use has been associated with a 35% increase in developing cancer, and patients receiving hypnotics are more than 4 times likely to die than people who are not on the drugs. It appears that the dosage plays a key role, but “even patients prescribed fewer than 18 hypnotic doses per year experienced increased mortality, with greater mortality associated with greater dosage prescribed.” (3)
Hi – I recently read that lemon is a great oil for focus in children. I also read that it pairs well with rosemary. I want to make a roller-bottle for my son to take to school. I am not really sure how to mix it. How many drops would you suggest of each and do I need to include a carrier oil? I am super new at this and the internet information and books are overwhelming. Thanks in advance.
I've recently gotten into essential oils and what I love about this set is that they are already mixed and labeled for what you want. So for my sinuses I already make my own version of "Breathe Best" because Vicks makes my skin peel. However, my blend means I have to purchase 4 oils to make one mixture. Now, I have one bottle already mixed that I stir into my coconut oil and use! The smells are amazing and the variety is perfect. You can use them in a diffuser or like I do, blended with coconut oil to put right on your skin!
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