Sleep is something that everyone needs, and no one gets enough of. I know from personal experience how sleep can affect everything from mental clarity and sanity to your pain levels and immune system strength. In my last sleep post, I gave you my favorite Sleepytime tea & tincture recipe, in this post we're going to learn about using aromatherapy to help you and your family sleep better. With so many great essential oils for sleep, I have put together my recipe for my favorite sleepytime essential oil blend that I like to call, Good Night Sleep Tight! This calming essential oil blend is good for more than just sleep, I even use this to control my Restless Leg Syndrome! 

Vetiver essential oil is made from tall perennial grass plants growing natively in India. It is an essential oil base note and  therefore has a very calming, stabilizing, and grounding nature. Vetiver smells quite grassy and ‘strong’, so I have not had much luck using it on its own. However, together with Lavender, Sweet Orange, or both, it makes a fantastic sleep blend that you’re sure to come back to.

For users who have trouble staying asleep, add 3 drops of chamomile essential oil and 2 drops of cedarwood essential oil to diffuser before you go to sleep. These essential oils for deep sleep will help your body relax throughout the night. Several high-quality diffusers have automatic timers, allowing the machine to run automatically as you fall asleep.
Thanks for your info Meaghan. It was very helpful. I have to say that I love, love essential oils. I did so much research and have used them for years. More than a year ago I decided to give Young Living a try after much research and even though I have tried other companies I have to say that I absolutely love Young Living. I know there are other great companies out there because I have used them. However Young Living is absolutely a wonderful company and their oils are amazing. I totally trust them and I have had such success with them health wise. I am a member of their Blue Spruce Club and everything I ever want to know about how to use essential oils is there. I love Thieves, YLs blend. It is amazing for everything. I still use other oils but YL is my favourite!

Hi there! I’m new (well several months in, but “new” in the grand scheme of things) to the world of EO’S but have learned a lot along the way. Thank you for writing about making blends; I hope to whip some up once I add a couple more EO’s to my stash. I did feel compelled to write & express my concern towards your “10 Must Have..” chart. I don’t know about all of the oils, but I do know that peppermint and eucalyptus especially are no-no’s for young children (eucalyptus can cause respiratory issues). And since there are several varieties of eucalyptus out there varying in strength, a parent could mistakenly purchase & use the strongest one on a too-young child! I do hope that this is taken in the manner it is written, with caring & concern!!


Asking these questions can help you to know whether you’re finding accurate information that you can trust or not. There are plenty of websites out there dedicated to teaching others about essential oils and aromatherapy whether it’s a school for essential oil studies, a company that sells essential oils, or a blogger who loves to share what she’s learning about them (and references her sources!).
I’m happy to say that the decision to create signature scents for my products (along with updating my branding and taking new photos) completely changed my business. I was invited to some pretty prestigious Etsy teams, my products were featured on Etsy’s front page over and over again, sales were coming in daily, I had repeat customers who were not only buying my products for themselves but as gifts too, and I had wholesale accounts and blog features… all because I made some simple, small changes to my products.
You can definitley combine both, Elizabeth. The ratio is totally your choice depending on what helps you. One thing you could do would be to make two separate personal inhalers (one with rosemary and one with lavender) and take a few deep breaths of the rosemary as needed, then, if you start feeling too anxious, start using the lavender one to calm you a bit. Maybe try it BEFORE you take a test… like during a study session, to see if it helps or not. Best of luck in your studies… I remember a lot of late nights getting ready for those big tests!
Hi Cari. I don’t have much experience with different types of EO diffusers. I have a Young Living diffuser that my MIL bought me, and I love it. I use it often and it works great. It’s pricy, but totally worth it to have one in my opinion. However, I have heard others say that the cheaper ones work just as well. I know Plant Therapy carries diffusers, and I think they have some really great ones that are lower priced. Hope that helps!

Ask any chiropractor and they will tell you that sleep position is as important as all the other factors we’ve discussed. If your body is not in a truly “restful,” relaxed posture, your sleep will definitely be dampened and you’ll end up with a kink in your neck or back. According to chiropractor Dr. David Jockers, here are some key dos and don’ts:
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
If we could spend each day of the week swimming in the ocean, boating on a lake, or twirling in the rain, we would! There’s nothing that smells more amazing than the seaside or a summer storm, and each of these blends will remind you of your treasured aqua adventures. Grab your trusty diffuser, add some YL essential oils, and press “go” on crashing waves and swimming pool cannon balls!
Any idea’s on blends for autism? CBD oil I think is going to change everything, it’s taken away 95% of my autism symptoms and I’m going in public now. Also off all 5 synthetic prescription and testing different blends with frankencense, vanilla, lavendar, and peppermint I got. I like those but I would like some woody smells. I’m not sure, I just can’t afford to keep buying a new bottle at a time for $10.
Hello I just recently got a divorce. And for a couple weeks could not sleep so the dr. put me on sleeping medicine I do not want to be on them and I was wondering if you could tell me what would be the best essential oils that I could use for falling asleep I use a necklace infuser. By using that would that work or should I apply to the body like you have said in this site. I use lemon oil for depression. What would you have me used to sleep thank you so much for your helping and I really appreciate your time and knowledge on helping me learn thank you.

A 2014 study showed significant effects from the inhalation of rose and orange essential oils reporting it “induces physiological and psychological relaxation.” A 2014 review looked at the effects of orange essential oil on insomnia and anxiety, citing positive results, while rose oil has had notable sedative effects in studies on mice, gerbils, and humans.


When it comes to blending essential oils for aromatic purposes (that means you’re blending based on scent rather than a therapeutic action), it’s important to make sure you find essential oil combinations that go together or attract so they smell nice once they’re blended together. I personally find this to be important when blending essential oils for therapeutic purposes as well, but that’s just a personal preference.  
When you smell a scent or an aroma, the smell hits the limbic system of your brain, which controls your memories and emotions. So that freshly-baked cookie probably makes you feel good about the times you baked cookies with grandma when you were little. Isn’t that amazing? Read on to find out the awesome benefits of aromatherapy as well as 30 wonderful essential oil diffuser recipes!
I also really enjoyed your information on blending. When I first started blending oils I didn’t know much so I would muscle test which ones I needed to use and in what quantity. It’s interesting as I am learning more of the “science” behind it, and I go back to my blend recipes and see how it all played out with the top, middle, and base notes, all in the correct quantities. It’s actually really fun to see. I am enjoying learning more, which makes me realize how much I don’t know!! 🙂
Lack of sleep has detrimental effects on many aspects of a person’s wake time. It affects your ability to concentrate, it has negative effects on your mood – making you short-tempered and moody, and it can even affect your physical performance. What’s worse is that all of these factors work together to play a damaging role in your personal and work relationships.
Hey Gabriela! I can’t speak from experience here because I’ve never made my own candles, but I too have heard that essential oils don’t work as well as fragrance oils in candles. No matter, I’d personally use them over fragrance oils. As far as the jasmine absolute… I don’t think you will get the scent you’re going for if you use any essential oil that’s already diluted in a carrier oil like the jojoba oil in this case. You need the concentrated oil. And yes, I’d still think the 30-50-20 rule would still apply if you want a rounded blend. Hope that helps… some!
To me, blend #1 sounds amazing! I imagine it to be fresh and sweet smelling with a touch of spice to ground it. Blend #2 feels like spring to me because it’s a pure floral blend. I can’t imagine preferring this blend over blend #1 because I tend to not like heavy floral scents, but you never know. Blend #3 sounds interesting, but I can’t say for sure what I think about it because I’m not familiar with angelica essential oil. The peppermint and pine sound like a great combination, but I’d have to test this to see what I thought of them alongside the angelica.
I’m sure this is in large amounts or if ingested. A small amount in a humidifier is not going to harm an animal I’m sure. Unless the owner was irresponsible about where they placed their humidifier and the animal knocked it over and drank it for some reason. But Jill seems to know a good deal about essential oils and has used them around her animals, I myself have been using them for years with my animals around not only in the humidifier.
You are what you eat! Your dietary practices can participate in how adequately you sleep, or don’t sleep. Eating and drinking the wrong things late in the evening, or having an unsatisfactory diet plan in general, can also be a variable. A late night glass of red or white wine, ale or shot of whiskey, may support you to drop off when you first retire but there’s a respectable risk it might result in you awaking midway through the night, or prematurely in the morning. Naturally there is also the chance that any stimulants you may be consuming could be inducing your sleeplessness.

[…] If you can make your cramped studio apartment feel more like a spa, why wouldn’t you? While some scents may help promote relaxation and sleep, other essential oils can help you start your day feeling more energized.  Try diffusing citrus, peppermint, rosemary, or eucalyptus oils to help you wake up in the morning. Or if you want to get a little crazy, try mixing it up with an essential oil recipe like one of these. […]
Keep in mind that there are not absolute rights and wrongs when it comes to essential oil categories. Information can sometimes vary from site to site and book to book, and you may need to check in more than one place. The more you use essential oils and become familiar with them, the easier it will be for you to categorize them based off how they smell to you.
Hey, Rachel. It looks like you may have too many top note EOs in your blend which is why you’re not getting that long-lasting scent from it. Rosemary is the only oil you listed that is a middle note, but it’s also considered a bit of a top note too. In all the blending formulas, the middle notes make up the largest portion of your blend with top notes coming in second and base notes coming in last as they mainly ground or stabalize your blend. If I were you, I would go through the process again, adding in more middle note oils and maybe taking out some top note oils. Or, you could always find some middle note oils that fit with the purpose of your blend and blend well with the oils you’re already using. In that case, all you’d need to do would be to adjust the amounts of each oil in the final blend (using the suggested formulas) so that your middle note oils make up the largest portion of the blend. Hope that helps! PS… There are also some essential oils that stimulate nerves that allow you to smell them once and then you can no longer smell them until the nerves are destimulated. I can’t remember which exact EOs that do that, but I read about it from an aromatherapist a while back. I’ve not looked into it much, but I thought that was interesting.

Hypnotic use has been associated with a 35% increase in developing cancer, and patients receiving hypnotics are more than 4 times likely to die than people who are not on the drugs. It appears that the dosage plays a key role, but “even patients prescribed fewer than 18 hypnotic doses per year experienced increased mortality, with greater mortality associated with greater dosage prescribed.” (3)
I have done extensive research on essential oils. NO oil should ever be injested. There are only a few food grade oils that can be injested. There is no such thing a therapeutic grade oil. Do more research. Many companies claim 100% pure and that may be, it’s the process that makes them unpure. If you want the real thing you must only buy USDA ORGANIC. The process is guaranteed minimal. No machinery so you not getting metals in your oil which is harmful to us. I hope this helps.
There seems to be new essential oil companies popping up every day, but I’ve used doTERRA essential oils for nearly 4 years and I’ll never go anywhere else. The oils are third-party tested for purity (you can SMELL the difference if you compare them to other brands), ethically sourced around the globe, and I love that doTERRA is a humanitarian-geared company. Hearing stories like this of a Wellness Advocate who is working hard to help Ebola-ravaged areas of Africa makes me so proud to be associated with this company. I’m happy to personally help you get these oils in your home and tell you more about why I chose doTERRA-– click here to connect with me. 
I’m a big proponent of using natural, mind-body therapies to create better sleep, both by helping sleep directly and by relieving stress, anxiety, low mood, and physical discomfort. The practice of aromatherapy can do all these things. Essential oils have been used for centuries to promote relaxation and mental and physical wellness. Today, these same oils are increasingly being studied by scientists in search of a more rigorous, specific understanding of their benefits to sleep and health.
Containing beneficial therapeutic qualities, Essential Oils are a natural alternative for promoting optimum health while supporting one’s physical and emotional well-being. Our 100% Pure Essential Oils are extracted from the root, bark, wood, seed, fruit, leaf, or flower of a freshly harvested plant. Our Starwest Aromatherapy Blends are blended with our 100% pure essential oils, making a high quality aromatherapy product. When combining certain essential oils in a way that amplifies their power, the result is a synergistic therapeutic blend.
As with Chamomile, you need to select the correct variety of Marjoram oil for better sleep as there are a few different plants/oils that go by the simple name of ‘marjoram’ only. The recommended variety is Sweet Marjoram (Origanum majorana) because it is said to have a calming and sedating action on the nervous system, which can certainly help when trying to go to sleep. It encourages relaxation before sleep. Sweet Marjoram can also help lower blood pressure, ease hyperactivity, and soothe feelings of grief, loneliness and rejection, or provide comfort for those suffering from the symptoms of common seasonal illnesses such as hay fever, allergies or cold and flu – all of which can add to a person’s suffering of insomnia.
You might be surprised to read the name of Sweet Orange essential oil (Citrus sinensis) in this list of essential oils for sleep, as most citrus oils have uplifting and energizing effects. You are right, they do! Citrus oils are very happy and bright oils, yet in the application for sleep, sweet orange helps relieve stress and brings balance to the mood, mind and body. It has a very pleasant aroma that appeals to a lot of people, and is able to generate calmness in situations of tension. I wouldn’t use sweet orange essential oil on its own for getting to sleep, but I would definitely add it to a sleep blend to help tie the blend together.
Too bad valerian smells like stinky feet, because it really does the trick when it comes to getting a good nights rest. Valerian has been used in many different ways for centuries to reduce stress, tension and instill a sense of peace and tranquility. You’ll definitely want to mask this scent with a blend. While it is pricey, and a bit of an acquired smell, this is definitely one of the most effective essential oils for insomnia.

Dear Tabitha thank you for these great recipes. I just have one question its a bit off topic. I want to be able to use the best possible unit to diffuse the Essential Oils. Which one would you recommend is best? I have been using ultrasonic ones but am thinking of about upgrading to either a vaporizer from http://www.herbalizer.com/ or a nebulizer from https://richaroms.com ? What I want to know is which technique of diffusion breaks the particles down to a state where our bodies can absorb them better?
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