First, thank you so much for posting these blends! I am so eager to try them. May I ask though – how does the size of your diffuser (and it’s water capacity) matter to the oil amounts in each ‘recipe’? For instance, my daughter has a smaller diffuser than me. Her’s holds a total of 120 ml. Mine on the other hand holds up to 300 ml. I almost never fill it to capacity with water, but it did start me wondering what water amount these blends were based upon.

As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.
Hi – I recently read that lemon is a great oil for focus in children. I also read that it pairs well with rosemary. I want to make a roller-bottle for my son to take to school. I am not really sure how to mix it. How many drops would you suggest of each and do I need to include a carrier oil? I am super new at this and the internet information and books are overwhelming. Thanks in advance.

As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.
I was leery of buying essential oils without knowing the company and smelling the product. I'm very experienced with aromatherapy and essential oils and have even run an aromatherapy business so I'm pretty picky about them (no, not the pyramid scheme ones, this was well before those businesses.) I have studied aromatherapy extensively. I took a gamble and bought these as a gift for my daughter mainly because of the packaging and the price. I was very pleasantly surprised at the quality of the oils. They are definitely aromatherapy quality and NOT fake fragrance oils. Essential oils don't always smell sweet and pleasant. Rosemary and Frankincense will have a more woody earthy smell and aren't like a scented candle. Don't expect them to smell yummy. They are intended for therapeutic use. So, if you're wanting a pleasant scent, you'll have ... full review
From my understanding and research (and I’m not an aromatherapist), all essential oils have particular qualities of smell as far as which are smelled first and which last a short while vs. a long while. This is why you blend them together based on those qualities (which are categorized as “notes”) so you can smell each oil among the others and have your blend last longer. Do you have to follow that rule? Of course not. If you’re making blends that are going to smell great and last a good while, should you follow that rule? Probably… I don’t know for sure as I’m not an aromatherapist and I don’t make perfume blends often.

thank you for your facts. I have a friend who only uses doterra..and she takes some internally. She is in school for herbology and thinks she knows everything about EO’s, and tells me how Doterra is the only one that sells “theropudic grade” EO and they sell all thats is out there. But i already researched that web site and saw that they did not sell ALL. Because I have done my research(google)lol, and now I have books by several reputable practitioners/authors[Lawless,Worwood,Grady]. I have told her that she is being mis informed about her EO usage and needs to be more cautious. But her response is always; oh dont worry..we are of mother earth..my family has been doing this for decades.(her family are descendents of an Indian culture, as is most of us..lol) so i will be fine, she says. well this is the generation of the hard headed(she is only 22, I be 47 so imma leave her to od on EO i guess..lol)
First off though, and this is an always ALWAYS rule for me, NEVER ingest any essential oils. Regardless of what essential oil companies say, and what you may have heard around the internet, I still think there are serious health risks to ingesting essential oils, and I will soon write an article dedicated to just this topic. I never ingest any oils myself, my aromatherapy-certified friends agree, and I will never recommend this to you either. ALWAYS DILUTE essential oils with water (in a diffuser), or with a carrier oil (for topical application).

There are several benefits of lavender essential oil including its sedative, anti-anxiety and stress reducing properties. Several studies have indicated that using lavender essential oil for sleep may help slow down the central nervous system activity. The resulting calming effect may cause a person to have better quality of sleep, reduced anxiety and improve overall mood.
I'm new to using essential oils and sensitive to strong smells so it took a while to figure out how much was enough for me and what was too much! The smell is great, kind of sweet and with a hint of spice. It is too strong for me if i use more than one drop but it has worked well for me and actually does help control my anxiety. I will definitely be using this long term and buying it again!
First, thank you so much for posting these blends! I am so eager to try them. May I ask though – how does the size of your diffuser (and it’s water capacity) matter to the oil amounts in each ‘recipe’? For instance, my daughter has a smaller diffuser than me. Her’s holds a total of 120 ml. Mine on the other hand holds up to 300 ml. I almost never fill it to capacity with water, but it did start me wondering what water amount these blends were based upon.
Because vetiver essential oil is distilled from the roots of the plant, it smells very rich and earthy. This is another great oil to try for sleep because it is psychologically grounding, calming and stabilizing. It can take you awhile to get used to the smell, so if you are a vetiver newbie, you can try mixing it with a floral or citrus oil, such as lavender or bergamot.

Next, place the diffuser below eye level. The aroma from your diffuser will rise on its own, so placing your diffuser in an area above your nose will prevent you from ever enjoying your oils. It’s also recommended that you place your diffuser in the center of the room, because the oil diffuses in a radial diameter. In other words, placing the diffuser in a corner of the room may cause the oil to hit the wall and rise upwards, reducing diffusion. However, if you don’t have an outlet in the center of your living room (like most people) just place your diffuser away from the wall.
The whole article was really helpful! My girlfriend and I are currently trying to find ways to raise money so she can fund a research aimed to study and protect a species that is now endangered in our country but it has been very difficult as many people don’t feel concerned. We’re now trying to find other ideas and she came up with the idea of making candles. Mixing essential oils can be quite difficult when you’re not sure if they would blend together well, especially when you don’t already have them on hand… Our idea is to create candles made from organic soy wax, that could also double as massage candles (she already made some and it does wonders for the skin), and blend oils with natural scents that remind people of different environments where they can also find endangered species, since we plan on donating a percentage of the money to different non-profit organizations. We had some ideas but don’t know much about essential oils, and this article has been SO helpful and is already helping us with our list of mixes so we can create wonderful scents. All these tips will also help us get to a slightly less ”amateur” result so we can offer products with different depths and scents, that last longer. Thanks a lot!
Many essential oils will fit into more than one category. You can blend them with other essential oils that blend well with the categories they fit in, or you can smell the essential oil and decide which category you think it best fits in. Blending is more about what you think rather than a list of hard and fast rules. I’m not sure if there’s a book on blending or not. I know you can learn more about it by doing it. I also know that some aromatherapists and perfumists teach courses on it so you may want to Google that.

I don’t care about money, I do want to get off disability though now that I have 16 hours of free time a day and am not stuck in a bed taking pills all day. I want quality though, and to be happy with everything regardless if I ever sold it, I want to give it away for free! I want to grow CBD and give it away. All of this can heal the entire World, that’s why they removed certain things and put synthetics with patents, never even asking us about our diet or exercise, they never cared. I’ve been marketed to my entire life for medicine I’m going to give it all away I think. Or earn the money and then donate it. I just don’t like money, it’s dangerous.

Investing in an essential oil diffuser is a great first step to filling your room with sleeping-inducing aromas, and there are so many affordable options that will be the perfect vessel for all of your sleepy-time blends. Once you have your diffuser all set up alongside your bed, you'll want to figure out which essential oils combine well to relax your body and calm your mind, so that you'll be able to enjoy a peaceful slumber every single night.
I hear what you’re saying Scott, and I’m not disagreeing with you. I don’t know a whole lot about the process, but I do know that bigger companies follow harvesting, storage, and extracting guidelines that not all home distillers follow. I also know that bigger companies have their oils routinely tested by 3rd party labs to check them for certain things. Again, not all home distillers do that. I’m sure that’s why people trust bigger EO companies, but if I were making and selling my own oils from home, I’d be sure I did those things and shouted it from the rooftops so people would know my oils were top notch. Thanks for sharing your process!
I believe sandalwood is a base not Annette. Of course you can combine whatever you like together if you think it smells good. I don’t think there are any black and white rules when it comes to blending as long as you have something from each note so your blend is “well rounded”. And from my understanding categories and notes are all relative to the other oils you’re referencing… they too are not black and white. Hope that helps some!
Sleeping problems include a wide range of conditions. Some people battle to fall asleep. Others fall asleep easily but cannot remain asleep for long enough. Still, others fall and remain asleep, but their sleep is interrupted by bad dreams and/or physical movement of their arms and legs. All of these people are left feeling tired the next day. Find out how to use essential oil to treat these sleeping problems.
Using Leslie’s list as an example, several of the oils on her list are known to be phototoxic, but since she’s not applying her blend to her skin in any way, she doesn’t have to worry about that so much. Instead, she’s more concerned with some of the oils being irritating the the mucous membranes as she will be diffusing this recipe so she decides to diffuse her blend for short periods of time only to minimize this possibility.
There are quite a few essential oils that can help with the issues that pertain to sleepless nights. Some are great for calming the body down while others can help shut off the mind when it won't shut up. Not all essential oils are created equal! If you are using these for small children and babies, be sure to check out my post on Essential Oil Safety for Babies & Children. These are just some essential oils that you can use in a sleepytime blend:
This makes smell unique among our senses. Information we take in from our other senses travels first to another region of the brain, the thalamus, which acts as a relay station, passing along sensory data to the other parts of the brain that produce our sensory perceptions. Only smell moves directly to the brain’s emotion and memory center. That’s why those memories you associate with the scent of garden roses, or banana bread baking in the oven, come on so quickly and so strongly.
I have several models of diffusers, and I can tell you hands-down the best is Young Living. I use their oils in the diffuser too. But what I love about them (over the ones from Target or Amazon) is that the Young Living diffusers disperse way more essential oils into the air. You can literally smell the difference. The diffusers also come with a one-year product warranty, so you can easily get a part replaced or the entire unit if you need to. I had several diffusers from other online stores stop working within a couple of months with no replacement.

[…] If you can make your cramped studio apartment feel more like a spa, why wouldn’t you? While some scents may help promote relaxation and sleep, other essential oils can help you start your day feeling more energized.  Try diffusing citrus, peppermint, rosemary, or eucalyptus oils to help you wake up in the morning. Or if you want to get a little crazy, try mixing it up with an essential oil recipe like one of these. […]
Hi, Dorothy. Great question, and this may be something you’ll want to run by an aromatherapist as they have more training in how EOs are made. But, from my understanding, whether the essential oil is extracted via steam (water), alcohol, or CO2… none of that comes through in the final product. As in, you don’t actually have water or alcohol or CO2 in the final essential oil. So, when you’re blending, you’re actually blending oil with oil regardless of the extraction process and emulsifiers aren’t needed. Now, I could be totally wrong there. Again, you’ll need to ask someone more knowledgeable in that area. Hope this helps.

Hi Meagan, Thanks for sharing, you really broke the process down in an easy to understand way. Wish I had the oils you used in the example so I could try it out. I’m going to read more of your blog. I do have a question though, I think you said you’ve used Eden’s Garden and Young Living. I’ve been using Eden’s Garden for 2 years now and since I never tried anything else I am very satisfied, just needed an opinion from someone else to help me in my research. Today I went to a class and made YL Thieves Disinfectant spray. All the oils she let us smell seemed more fragrant than my EG EOs, I was wondering if you ever noticed that and what may be the reason. I’m not sure how oils are “supposed” to smell, only that I did notice a slight difference.
You can definitely add essential oils to lotion bases. The ratio will depend on the essential oils in the mix and how much area of the body they will cover. This will definitely require more research and perhaps consulting from an aromatherapist. There are also a lot of great books out there that teach you how to use essential oils in skin care products that could offer more information as well. Hope this answers your question!
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During the day I use my Lampe Bergers…and buying their fuel has become an expense I feel is impractical. So, I’ve been trying to make some myself, using 91% isopropyl alcohol and a blend of essential oils. I really haven’t had any problems, other than the scents I’ve made are just not very strong. Could it be that my oils are not good enough for this purpose? I’ve done some testing of different brands by putting just a drop of oil onto a piece of paper and allowing it to dry. The Majestic Pure dries almost completely, without leaving much of a mark on the paper, while other brands dry leaving an oily mark. Is it possible that the Majestic Pure has alcohol in it?
You are what you eat! Your dietary practices can participate in how adequately you sleep, or don’t sleep. Eating and drinking the wrong things late in the evening, or having an unsatisfactory diet plan in general, can also be a variable. A late night glass of red or white wine, ale or shot of whiskey, may support you to drop off when you first retire but there’s a respectable risk it might result in you awaking midway through the night, or prematurely in the morning. Naturally there is also the chance that any stimulants you may be consuming could be inducing your sleeplessness.

Dear Tabitha thank you for these great recipes. I just have one question its a bit off topic. I want to be able to use the best possible unit to diffuse the Essential Oils. Which one would you recommend is best? I have been using ultrasonic ones but am thinking of about upgrading to either a vaporizer from http://www.herbalizer.com/ or a nebulizer from https://richaroms.com ? What I want to know is which technique of diffusion breaks the particles down to a state where our bodies can absorb them better?
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