CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
You can get a diffuser at retail, but I highly suggest getting a starter kit at 60% off that includes the diffuser for free. I really like the Desert Mist (which has different LED settings – even a candle flicker setting – and goes for 8-10 hours). That way you get the diffuser and the oils all in one set. I only use about 6-10 drops total in the diffuser for each use.
thank you for your facts. I have a friend who only uses doterra..and she takes some internally. She is in school for herbology and thinks she knows everything about EO’s, and tells me how Doterra is the only one that sells “theropudic grade” EO and they sell all thats is out there. But i already researched that web site and saw that they did not sell ALL. Because I have done my research(google)lol, and now I have books by several reputable practitioners/authors[Lawless,Worwood,Grady]. I have told her that she is being mis informed about her EO usage and needs to be more cautious. But her response is always; oh dont worry..we are of mother earth..my family has been doing this for decades.(her family are descendents of an Indian culture, as is most of us..lol) so i will be fine, she says. well this is the generation of the hard headed(she is only 22, I be 47 so imma leave her to od on EO i guess..lol)
As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.
Yes, vegetable oils or other forms of fat are the best way to properly dilute essential oils. I believe some aromatherapists say that mixing EOs with heavy whipping cream and adding that to baths is acceptable and safe as the fat in the cream helps disperse the oil, but as far as putting EOs on your skin goes… diluting them in a carrier oil is best. You can find some oils that aren’t greasy. I believe they’re called “dry oils.” Rosehip seed oil is an example, and there are several others. Maybe Google it to get some other examples. Hope this answers your question.
Once you’ve blended all your blends together to test them, it’s time to take a break and let your blends rest for a minimum of 24 hours… 48 hours is better. This is so each blend’s aroma can develop. Believe it or not, when you open your blends back up the next day, they’re going to smell a bit different than you remember. This is why keeping good notes is important. You want to describe what you smell so you can remember where your blend has been and where it is now. This will help you to see if you like what you’ve created.
OK. I'm pretty skeptical about the whole aromatherapy thing but this stuff really works! I've been using a drop or so on my pillow as well as rubbing it on the soles of my feet, and I fall asleep in just a few minutes. If I wake up in the middle of the night, I dab some on my wrists (I sleep with my hands under my head) and I'm right back to sleep. It works better than melatonin!
Thanks so much Michelle. As far as getting EO recipes… I’m not aware of any NEW books out by any well-known aromatherapists, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t. I’m not an aromatherapist so I’m not in that circle too much. I get a lot of recipes from Vintage Remedies (Jessie Hawkins is an aromatherapist) and Aromahead (an aromatherapy school) as well as older books by respected aromatherapists and companies that sell quality essential oils. I know Plant Therapy, Eden Gardens, and Mountain Rose Herbs shares recipes from time to time. Good luck!!
I posted a reply comment regarding the price of essential oils stating that in most cases you do get what you pay for but some companies are overpriced. This was obviously a comment that you did not want read and felt threatened by the content. Obviously your philosophy is based financially and not in the best interest of what is good for the consumer. Shame on you!
I am enjoying learning about essential oils and am appreciating them so much! Thank you for this article. I do have a question for you … How do I choose and use a diffuser? I am currently using my old scentsy burner – water with a few drops of essential oil – as a diffuser, but it evaporates so quickly and the scent is so light. I’m guessing I need a diffuser, but there are so many, I don’t know what to buy. What do you suggest for longer lasting air diffusion? Thank you!
It’s worth it to have a high quality diffuser to diffuse essential oils. This Smiley Daisy Essential Oil Diffuser, Quite Cool Mist Humidifier, 350 ml has been around for a long while and has great reviews. Smiley Daisy is a cold air diffuser, as well as a humidifier, which is great because it releases moisture into the air and is helpful in providing relief for dry skin, dry throat and cold and flu symptoms such as irritated nasal passages and more. Order below:
×