srrryy i forgot to tell that im talkin about essential oils and im using three oils for this purpose lavender bcoz of its good soothing frangrance and as well as mosquito repellent property and the other two are eucalyptus essential oil and clove oil which has great mosquito repellent need your help how to mix it and use it. it may be chances that after mixing these oils only aroma will come and the other property of mpsquito repellent will not work or may be aftr mixing aroma can be effectd so which mixing of which oil give optimum performance i need help about it give your suggestion plzzzz

I’m sure this is in large amounts or if ingested. A small amount in a humidifier is not going to harm an animal I’m sure. Unless the owner was irresponsible about where they placed their humidifier and the animal knocked it over and drank it for some reason. But Jill seems to know a good deal about essential oils and has used them around her animals, I myself have been using them for years with my animals around not only in the humidifier.


One thing you said that I didn’t know was that if you mix oils the compounds and effects can change based on the orders of mixing. I haven’t seen that anywhere so if you have a link to that info, I’d love to see it. And as far as the article I mention… I’m not sure which one you’re referring to. Just let me know though, and I’ll try to direct you to it.
Keep in mind that there are not absolute rights and wrongs when it comes to essential oil categories. Information can sometimes vary from site to site and book to book, and you may need to check in more than one place. The more you use essential oils and become familiar with them, the easier it will be for you to categorize them based off how they smell to you.

I’m not sure what you’re asking me, Helen. Are you looking for a dilution chart that shows how many drops of preblended essential oils to put in a carrier oil? Lea over at Learning About EOs has a whole post on this, but keep in mind that dilution rates vary based on who the oil is for and what it’s for. Her post should answer your questions though.
It’s important to note: sandalwood has also been shown to increase wakefulness and alertness, even when it is also triggering physical relaxation. Everyone reacts to scents differently. Sandalwood may deliver sleep benefits for some people, while for others, it may promote wakeful, attentive relaxation. If that’s the case for you, sandalwood isn’t right for nighttime, but you can use it during the day to feel relaxed and alert.
I could be wrong, but I think Danika is confusing the term therapeutic grade with the “100% Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” that doTERRA coined and uses. Some oils are labeled for aromatherapy only, and others state they are therapeutic grade which I imagine is to indicate they are also for medicinal purposes. Not referring to ingestion, but topical applications.
Next, try diluting your blend in a carrier oil. You can take 4 drops of any carrier oil such as jojoba, sweet almond, grapeseed, avocado, or any oil you’d like (preferably one without a strong scent) and add 1 drop of your essential oil blend to it. You now have a 20% dilution. Now smell it? What do you think? Does that change the scent? What do you notice first? How does it make you feel now? Describe your thoughts in your notebook.
No that was my question! I was worried those smells wouldn’t blend properly (Lavender as the primary + rosemary with a touch of oak moss which i know will be hard with oak moss absolute as being thick!-I’ve been warned thicker than vetiver!) and the idea of the dried herbs(rosemary and lavender) in jasmine rice together… would I get lucky on any advice for mixing those oils with a general ratio in mind or if my OG idea of drop count sounded possibly safe?
Oh good for you! It’s tough picking your oils, but base notes do help your smells to last longer. Patchouli, sandalwood, and vanilla are some of my favorite base notes. I’m not sure how great each of those would smell with the oils you used, but you’d have to test it out and see. Another thing I’ve learned is that when you’re making something, it will always smell stronger when you’re making it than when you put it on so sometimes you need to add a good bit more of the oils for good measure. Hope that helps!
According to a study published by Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, cancer patients have a particularly tough go at getting good sleep. Subjects were given aromatherapy over a 13-week period of time. The effects were very beneficial, producing more sleep for the patients. In fact, over 90 percent said they would continue use of the blend that included bergamot, lavender, sandalwood, frankincense and mandarin. (1) 
Someone may have mentioned this already, but if a company makes certain claims about how their product should be used (i.e. reduces inflammation, relieves stress, heals wounds, etc.), they are required to label their product as a drug under FDA laws. Any product that is declared as a drug must include additional information on their labeling and are subject to other regulations regarding drugs. Companies that declare their EOs are therapeutic are also responsible for supporting the therapeutic or medicine claims made on their labels. Most companies, however, do not claim their EOs are therapeutic or medicinal is because they do not want to have the extra oversight and responsibility that comes with such a claim. There are other specific things they avoid putting on their labels and additional cautions made to ensure their EOs are not considered medicinal, even if their oils are the same content and grades as other “therapeutic” oils on the market.
Information and statements about the products on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using any herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For now, you can look to books with essential oil profiles or online websites of essential oil suppliers for information on notes. And just like essential oil categories, the information you find on essential oils notes will vary. Some essential oils have one note while others are thought to have a combination of two with one of the two being more dominant than the other.


Since a clinical study dating back to 1995, for example, we have known that sleep duration significantly decreases in older patients who are dependent on benzodiazepines. However, once lavender essential oil aromatherapy was introduced into their lives, their sleep quality and duration can be restored to previous levels, in spite of not being on the drugs. According to the researchers who conducted this landmark research, “This study suggested that ambient lavender oil might be used as a temporary relief from continued medication for insomnia and reduces the side-effects of these drugs.” (6, 7)

I’m not sure what you’re asking me, Helen. Are you looking for a dilution chart that shows how many drops of preblended essential oils to put in a carrier oil? Lea over at Learning About EOs has a whole post on this, but keep in mind that dilution rates vary based on who the oil is for and what it’s for. Her post should answer your questions though.
Your information is the best the best I’ve read yet! I’ve just started using essential oils…I use them in my diffuser at night, as it helps my eternally stuffy nose from allergies. Any scents seem to help, as I believe it’s the moisture it puts into the air that helps. I’ve been using a blend of Bergamot and Lemongrass. Both are made by Majestic Pure, and do just fine.
I’m not sure what you’re asking me, Helen. Are you looking for a dilution chart that shows how many drops of preblended essential oils to put in a carrier oil? Lea over at Learning About EOs has a whole post on this, but keep in mind that dilution rates vary based on who the oil is for and what it’s for. Her post should answer your questions though.

Hey, Rachel. It looks like you may have too many top note EOs in your blend which is why you’re not getting that long-lasting scent from it. Rosemary is the only oil you listed that is a middle note, but it’s also considered a bit of a top note too. In all the blending formulas, the middle notes make up the largest portion of your blend with top notes coming in second and base notes coming in last as they mainly ground or stabalize your blend. If I were you, I would go through the process again, adding in more middle note oils and maybe taking out some top note oils. Or, you could always find some middle note oils that fit with the purpose of your blend and blend well with the oils you’re already using. In that case, all you’d need to do would be to adjust the amounts of each oil in the final blend (using the suggested formulas) so that your middle note oils make up the largest portion of the blend. Hope that helps! PS… There are also some essential oils that stimulate nerves that allow you to smell them once and then you can no longer smell them until the nerves are destimulated. I can’t remember which exact EOs that do that, but I read about it from an aromatherapist a while back. I’ve not looked into it much, but I thought that was interesting.
Hi, Jesslyn. Essential oils do have shelf-lives as do base oils (also known as carrier oils). The shelf-life will vary based on each oil so you’ll want to research each oil in your DIY blend to find that information as well as any carrier oil you add your EO blend into. When stored properly, most EOs and EO blends diluted in carrier oils will last 1-2 years. Hope that helps!
Word of Caution: The use of essential oils for sleep problems is very popular, but it is important to consider the side effects that some of these oils may have. They are packed with active compounds and chemicals that could negatively interact with medications, exacerbate health conditions, irritate the skin, disturb the stomach, cause blood pressure to drop dangerously low, or leave you feeling fatigued or sluggish. Each oil has individual components and risks, so additional research is necessary before you add one to your daily health regimen. Furthermore, you should always discuss your personal risks before using one of these potent essential oils for sleep.
Thanks for your info Meaghan. It was very helpful. I have to say that I love, love essential oils. I did so much research and have used them for years. More than a year ago I decided to give Young Living a try after much research and even though I have tried other companies I have to say that I absolutely love Young Living. I know there are other great companies out there because I have used them. However Young Living is absolutely a wonderful company and their oils are amazing. I totally trust them and I have had such success with them health wise. I am a member of their Blue Spruce Club and everything I ever want to know about how to use essential oils is there. I love Thieves, YLs blend. It is amazing for everything. I still use other oils but YL is my favourite!

Most commonly, essential oils are used in an essential diffuser together with water. Aromatherapy works quite well over our olfactory system (=sense of smell) as many emotions can be triggered by certain cents alone. While there are other ways to use essential oils, diffuser blending is a fun art and hobby on its own that many essential oil enthusiasts enjoy.
To make your DIY sleep aid blend, place each of the oils in your bottle, put the cap on and shake well. These ingredients are amazing for some much-needed shut eye. Lavender oil is so versatile. I use it throughout the day for a calming effect, which holds true for solid sleep. It relaxes the body and eases tension creating the perfect platform for rest.
Sure Dorie. So after you’ve got your essential oil blend, you can diffuse it at home to get it into the air or you can just open the bottle and sniff it from time to time. That’s two great ways to use EOs safely… assuming the oils are appropriate for your son’s age. For school, the best bet is to dilute the EO blend in a carrier oil (like jojoba oil) and put it in a 1 oz. glass bottle with a roller top. That way it’s easy to apply. Simply rub a little bit on the insides of the wrist, behind the ears, the temple area, or the neck and you should be able to absorb it into the skin slowly as well as smell it for a bit. Hope that helps!! Let me know if you have any other questions!
Shower Steamers – This is a really great method to use when you NEED to calm the kiddos down before bed. As a mother, I understand this feeling! I find that a shower or bath tends to help relax and calm a child down. On those really crazy days, just add a couple drops to a shower steamer and drop in the tub to let it diffuse in the heated shower. It will help calm and soothe your child before bed, helping them to fall asleep faster. You can also add a couple drops to the Epsom salt for a nice bedtime bath!
The great thing about these recipes, is that you can experiment and change them based on what you like! So if you start with the recipe, but find you need more, you can add in more! My diffusers are all mid-size and hold between 100-150 ml of water. These recipes are based on that size (most home diffusers are similar in size). You can still use these recipes with yours! If you find you need to add more oil since you’re adding more water, add in a few extra drops of each and see how that does for you. Sometimes in a large open space I find that I need to add in a little more myself. 😉 Hope that helps… have you tried any yet?? I’d love to hear which ones you like!
The whole article was really helpful! My girlfriend and I are currently trying to find ways to raise money so she can fund a research aimed to study and protect a species that is now endangered in our country but it has been very difficult as many people don’t feel concerned. We’re now trying to find other ideas and she came up with the idea of making candles. Mixing essential oils can be quite difficult when you’re not sure if they would blend together well, especially when you don’t already have them on hand… Our idea is to create candles made from organic soy wax, that could also double as massage candles (she already made some and it does wonders for the skin), and blend oils with natural scents that remind people of different environments where they can also find endangered species, since we plan on donating a percentage of the money to different non-profit organizations. We had some ideas but don’t know much about essential oils, and this article has been SO helpful and is already helping us with our list of mixes so we can create wonderful scents. All these tips will also help us get to a slightly less ”amateur” result so we can offer products with different depths and scents, that last longer. Thanks a lot!
You don't have to rely on habit forming sedatives or over the counter  Benadryl & Tylenol (Tylenol PM) to get to sleep. Sleep issues are most often underlying symptoms from other health issues. Before you chug down pills to cover up your chronic sleep problem, you might try making some of these changes in your life first, to see what helps you get a better night's rest:
A simple way to enjoy the sedative properties of essential oils is to directly inhale the aroma from the bottle. Hold the bottle 1-2 inches away from your nose and take several deep breaths.  It’s recommended that you use a nebulizing diffuser for direct oil inhalation, but do not inhale the vapours directly, as these vapours can be very concentrated.
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