You need a cool-air diffuser. These diffusers usually require a small amount of distilled water to be added along with essential oils. Note: Cold air diffusers ranges vary, with most around 250 feet. So if you are trying to diffuse your bedroom and living room, most likely you will need two diffusers. This one is my favorite for the money and size/features.
Thank you a million times for this post. My son turned 2 in December. I have not had a full night’s sleep since he was born. I was becoming very desperate. I read this post and decided to give it a go. I combine Cedarwood, frankincense and ylang ylang in my diffuser. My son still sleeps in our bed most nights, but at least now we all get a full 8 hours. Thank you again!

This reason alone makes it important to choose the right diffuser and my advice to reap all of the benefits of essential oils is to stick with a cold-air, nebulizing or ultrasonic diffuser. I DO keep a little plugin diffuser in my car, although that one does heat up, so I know I’m getting the calming benefits of the scents, but I may be losing out on some of the other aromatherapy effects. 

Hi Cari. I don’t have much experience with different types of EO diffusers. I have a Young Living diffuser that my MIL bought me, and I love it. I use it often and it works great. It’s pricy, but totally worth it to have one in my opinion. However, I have heard others say that the cheaper ones work just as well. I know Plant Therapy carries diffusers, and I think they have some really great ones that are lower priced. Hope that helps!

Middle notes are like the “ties that bind” only they are binding your other essential oils together into a harmonized blend. These are the oils that complete your blend by balancing the light top notes with the deep base notes. The aroma of middle notes lasts longer than those of top notes, but not as long as base notes. These oils can vary in consistency and are often derived from whole herbs and spices.
Shower Steamers – This is a really great method to use when you NEED to calm the kiddos down before bed. As a mother, I understand this feeling! I find that a shower or bath tends to help relax and calm a child down. On those really crazy days, just add a couple drops to a shower steamer and drop in the tub to let it diffuse in the heated shower. It will help calm and soothe your child before bed, helping them to fall asleep faster. You can also add a couple drops to the Epsom salt for a nice bedtime bath!
Thank you SO MUCH for your information in regards to the so called “therapeutic Essential Oils” I long suspected there was no such thing and it is a Marketing ploy for these two companies in question as well, I have been personally challenged by doTERRA consultants because my Essential oils are much cheaper than theirs, but I purchase Pure essential oils, bottle and resell, I have had no complaints in 17 years, your information has helped me feel much more secure in what I am doing?Kind regards Linda
As you’re using essential oils, pay attention to how you feel. Scent is a highly individual experience. Each of us react to smells differently. The right scents for your relaxation and sleep are the ones that make you feel relaxed and sleepy! You may need to experiment with different oils before you find the right one for your nightly routine. If a scent makes you feel alert and awake, it is NOT the right one for sleep. But you can use it in the morning to help get you rolling into your day.
While some of the causes of sleep disorders cannot be controlled or mitigated by essential oils, the soothing and relaxing qualities of these oils can help calm the body and mind, making it easier for people to find restful sleep. This is due to the sedative, anxiolytic, anti-depressant, soothing, warming, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties of these essential oils.
Yes, both are great for attention, but I’ll caution you about using rosemary on a child under 10 as that’s supposedly the minimum age to use it safely unless it’s really, really diluted. You can find more info about essential oil safety here. As for drop amounts, if it were me, lemon would be used most with a bit of rosemary. I’d do a 3% dilution so maybe 2 drops of lemon and 1 of rosemary for every 1 teaspoon of carrier oil you use… yes, it does need to be diluted in a carrier oil. ALL oils using on children, and most adults, should be diluted. It’s just too risky to not, and that helps spread them over the body more and have more surface are to absorb better. Hope that helps and gives you a start. If it doesn’t work as well as you’d like you can always adjust the oils or the dilution, but remember to keep it at a safe level.
Essential oils can act by triggering the central nervous system and circulatory system to promote sleep in the body. To test these effects, an increasing amount of scientific studies have been conducted to evaluate their effectiveness on humans. The following are considered the best essential oils for sleep due to their sedative, calming or stress-reducing properties.
It really depends on the size of your diffuser. The combination, I think is based on your preference, but the total drops should be 6-7 for a 100 – 150 ml water tank, and 8-10 for a 200-350 ml tank. I also have a 750 ml diffuser/vaporizer I haven’t used yet, so I am thinking I would use 15-20 drops in that. I would start on the lighter side, and then increase to the higher recommended amount based on your tolerance. I began using EOs starting with diffusing lavender and a Good Nite blend last summer to help me sleep, as I couldn’t fall asleep and stay asleep. Now I am educating myself in all the benefits, and am slowly becoming addicted.
According to a study published by Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, cancer patients have a particularly tough go at getting good sleep. Subjects were given aromatherapy over a 13-week period of time. The effects were very beneficial, producing more sleep for the patients. In fact, over 90 percent said they would continue use of the blend that included bergamot, lavender, sandalwood, frankincense and mandarin. (1) 
Okay, so I am clearly late to the game on this post, but I am so glad I found it! Jill, I have been researching essential oils, diffusers, oil blends, etc. – and my gosh!, there is a lot of information out there. It is overwhelming. Thank you for this very helpful, easy to follow post on using essential oils in a diffuser. I signed up to receive your emails and got your book for FREE. Thank you! My family of four has been so sick this past month. My friends keep telling me that I need to be using essential oils. Your blog is fantastic. I know I will be coming back to visit often. Blessings, Jana
Hi Megan! I’m new to oils, and I’m looking specifically for oils that help with anxiety, depression, insomnia, and colds/flu. I have right now sweet orange, lemongrass, frankincense, tea tree, peppermint, rosemary, eucalyptus, and lavender. Could you offer some direction/advice on where to start with what I have? I would be using them by diffusing with a diffuser or using the steam from taking a shower if that helps. Thanks!
To me, they all seem very distinct with stimulating and clarifying properties. You have strong, medicinal or minty type oils like rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, you have some woodsy oils such as pine and cypress, and then you have some citrus oils such as grapefruit, lemon, bergamot, neroli. You even have some floral oils like rose, geranium, and ylang ylang and some spicier oils such as black pepper, nutmeg, and ginger.
Hi Meagan, Thanks for sharing, you really broke the process down in an easy to understand way. Wish I had the oils you used in the example so I could try it out. I’m going to read more of your blog. I do have a question though, I think you said you’ve used Eden’s Garden and Young Living. I’ve been using Eden’s Garden for 2 years now and since I never tried anything else I am very satisfied, just needed an opinion from someone else to help me in my research. Today I went to a class and made YL Thieves Disinfectant spray. All the oils she let us smell seemed more fragrant than my EG EOs, I was wondering if you ever noticed that and what may be the reason. I’m not sure how oils are “supposed” to smell, only that I did notice a slight difference.
I am enjoying learning about essential oils and am appreciating them so much! Thank you for this article. I do have a question for you … How do I choose and use a diffuser? I am currently using my old scentsy burner – water with a few drops of essential oil – as a diffuser, but it evaporates so quickly and the scent is so light. I’m guessing I need a diffuser, but there are so many, I don’t know what to buy. What do you suggest for longer lasting air diffusion? Thank you!
Environmental Causes: Sleeplessness may possibly be brought on by your environment. This could be things like noise, lighting, heat level, the sort of bed you sleep in, what you wear to bed and more. Some case in points might just also include a bedroom window that faces onto a bright streetlamp, a bedroom that is in near vicinity to a busy and noisy road, or could be excessively warm heating systems (or way too chilled central air conditioning). Other problems could include having a mattress that is excessively hard, or overly soft. Having pillows that don’t cradle your head and neck adequately or having on bed clothes that are unduly restrictive.
Hey Sarah! I’m actually not an aromatherapist, and I don’t make blends for people. I just share what I’m learning and how I do things. My suggestions for you would be to come up with a cleaning routine that keeps your house clean (which will help with dust mites as you know) and search Google for EO bug blends. I actually have some on GUH, but I’m not sure how they’d work for dust mites. You may also want to work with an aromatherapist if you have more questions. Thanks!
Many essential oils will fit into more than one category. You can blend them with other essential oils that blend well with the categories they fit in, or you can smell the essential oil and decide which category you think it best fits in. Blending is more about what you think rather than a list of hard and fast rules. I’m not sure if there’s a book on blending or not. I know you can learn more about it by doing it. I also know that some aromatherapists and perfumists teach courses on it so you may want to Google that.
Hi, Kelly. The opt-in form is at the very bottom of the post, above the references and author info. If you still don’t see it, it could be a technical issues, and I can sign you up manually with your permission. Just let me know. Update: Hey, Kelly. I’m showing that you’ve been added to the list so you should receive your download link soon. Sorry for the trouble!
One thing you said that I didn’t know was that if you mix oils the compounds and effects can change based on the orders of mixing. I haven’t seen that anywhere so if you have a link to that info, I’d love to see it. And as far as the article I mention… I’m not sure which one you’re referring to. Just let me know though, and I’ll try to direct you to it.
No that was my question! I was worried those smells wouldn’t blend properly (Lavender as the primary + rosemary with a touch of oak moss which i know will be hard with oak moss absolute as being thick!-I’ve been warned thicker than vetiver!) and the idea of the dried herbs(rosemary and lavender) in jasmine rice together… would I get lucky on any advice for mixing those oils with a general ratio in mind or if my OG idea of drop count sounded possibly safe?
That’s okay, there’s a better way… use a diffuser with therapeutic-grade essential oils instead. I know it’s a little overwhelming when you first get a diffuser and essential oils, so I put together this list of my favorite essential oil diffuser recipes. First thing to remember is to follow the manufacturers directions on your diffuser for how to clean, type of water to use, number of drops of essential oil, etc.
Weird question- how can you switch from mix to mix in the same diffuser without having crossover? Is cleaning it out very complicated? And how to inhibit mold growth in the cold air diffuser- is it just a bonus that the EOs are anti bacterial/biotic/fungal or do you have to add some other ingredient? (I did read the article, I just didn’t see it, but it’s almost 1 am, so that may be why, lol)
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
Sleep is something that everyone needs, and no one gets enough of. I know from personal experience how sleep can affect everything from mental clarity and sanity to your pain levels and immune system strength. In my last sleep post, I gave you my favorite Sleepytime tea & tincture recipe, in this post we're going to learn about using aromatherapy to help you and your family sleep better. With so many great essential oils for sleep, I have put together my recipe for my favorite sleepytime essential oil blend that I like to call, Good Night Sleep Tight! This calming essential oil blend is good for more than just sleep, I even use this to control my Restless Leg Syndrome! 
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Sleep deficiency may start suddenly or may slowly become a habit over time. On a day-to-day basis, sleep deficiency can affect learning, memory recall, decision making, the ability to deal with change, and how we express our emotions or behaviors. Chronic sleep deficiency can increase the risk of certain health problems, such as obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.1
According to a study published by Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, cancer patients have a particularly tough go at getting good sleep. Subjects were given aromatherapy over a 13-week period of time. The effects were very beneficial, producing more sleep for the patients. In fact, over 90 percent said they would continue use of the blend that included bergamot, lavender, sandalwood, frankincense and mandarin. (1) 
For depression: Depression and sleep problems often go hand in hand. A number of studies have examined the effects of aromatherapy using essential oils in people with depression and depressive symptoms, both with and without anxiety. Aromatherapy can help improve depressive symptoms, according to the results of several studies. A study found aromatherapy improved both depression and anxiety in a group of post-partum women. And a 2016 analysis found aromatherapy effective in reducing stress and depression—as well as symptoms of menopause—in middle-aged women.

It’s important to note: sandalwood has also been shown to increase wakefulness and alertness, even when it is also triggering physical relaxation. Everyone reacts to scents differently. Sandalwood may deliver sleep benefits for some people, while for others, it may promote wakeful, attentive relaxation. If that’s the case for you, sandalwood isn’t right for nighttime, but you can use it during the day to feel relaxed and alert.
I’m sure this is in large amounts or if ingested. A small amount in a humidifier is not going to harm an animal I’m sure. Unless the owner was irresponsible about where they placed their humidifier and the animal knocked it over and drank it for some reason. But Jill seems to know a good deal about essential oils and has used them around her animals, I myself have been using them for years with my animals around not only in the humidifier.
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