Well, aromatherapy (or smelling essential oils) can do the same thing. They can help to support your mood and emotions. Think about how you feel when you smell a fresh-cut lemon or how about Lavender from the garden? Maybe energized from the lemon and relaxed with the lavender? Well, it’s no surprise. Essential oils are highly concentrated aromatic essences of those plants. That’s why smelling them is a really effective way of using essential oils. This is called aromatic use. Be sure to check out How to Support Emotions with Essential Oils.
Roman Chamomile is an ancient herb that can help with your sleeplessness caused from chronic stress, headaches or nervous disorders. It is a great choice to help you relax and prepare for sleep. Chamomile can also aid the efficiency of your digestive function, making this oil especially handy when suspecting that your sleeplessness might also have a relation to some digestive problems. Combined with Lavender above, Roman Chamomile Oil is a powerful and effective choice of a natural sleep aid treatment.
When creating essential oil blends, the ratio I almost always follow is what I call the “30-50-20 Rule.” This is an essential oil blending ratio where you use 30% of your top note oil, 50% of your middle note oil, and 20% of your base note oil in your blend. This blending ratio consists of 10 total drops of essential oils, totaling 100% once combined.

Go to bed before your second wind – it has been said that 1 hour of sleep between the hours of 10:00 pm and 2:00 am has the same effect on your body as 2 hours of sleep after 2:00 am because of our natural circadian rhythm. This seems logical as most people become naturally tired around 10:00 pm or so. What’s the risk of staying up late? If you choose to stay awake past this time, you will often experience a cortisol-driven “second wind.” Our body regulates hormones around midnight and people will find themselves up until 2:00 am or so unless they get to bed earlier.


Thanks so much Michelle. As far as getting EO recipes… I’m not aware of any NEW books out by any well-known aromatherapists, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t. I’m not an aromatherapist so I’m not in that circle too much. I get a lot of recipes from Vintage Remedies (Jessie Hawkins is an aromatherapist) and Aromahead (an aromatherapy school) as well as older books by respected aromatherapists and companies that sell quality essential oils. I know Plant Therapy, Eden Gardens, and Mountain Rose Herbs shares recipes from time to time. Good luck!!

Getting a good night's sleep can sometimes feel as impossible and frustrating as trying to lick your elbow (if you've never tried it, I bet you just did — I see you, fam). There are a lot of different sleep aids on the market, but personally, I think adding some essential oils to your nightly routine is one of the best ways to get a good snooze. Many essential oils are specifically dedicated to helping you doze off, and combining some of these relaxing, fragrant substances into essential oil blends for sleep is a surefire way to reap all the bedtime benefits you're searching for.
Lavender is said to ease tension and induce relaxation. In studies done by Britain’s University of Southampton, they found that participants who diffused lavender oil at night ranked their sleep an average of 20% better than the placebo group. Newer research done by Wesleyan University confirms these findings. When combined with roman chamomile it delivers a knock-out punch for insomnia.

I recently took a class at my university on the use of essential oils and my professor mentioned that in rare cases peppermint can be extremely dangerous in children under 6. I believe Amplatz Children’s Hospital in Minnesota uses spearmint rather than peppermint as it produces similar effects. Please follow the link bleow for more information about this under the Special Considerations section. If you also find this information concerning I would suggest removing peppermint from your children’s top ten list.
I found you while searching for information about essential oils. You have a really neat site and with tons of great and valuable information that helps me a lot. I have been using essential oils for some time now, specially for cleaning around my home and for room sprays . I am now making soy candles but I am using essential oils instead of fragrance oils, even though some says that essential oils doesn’t have a very good scent throw in candles. My question for you is, Can I use jasmine absolute in jojoba oil for scent my wax? And what will be the ratio for blending in 6oz of soy wax? Would the 30-50-20 rule apply the same for blending essential oils for candles?
First, thank you so much for posting these blends! I am so eager to try them. May I ask though – how does the size of your diffuser (and it’s water capacity) matter to the oil amounts in each ‘recipe’? For instance, my daughter has a smaller diffuser than me. Her’s holds a total of 120 ml. Mine on the other hand holds up to 300 ml. I almost never fill it to capacity with water, but it did start me wondering what water amount these blends were based upon.
Hi Meagan, I’m somewhat new to the EO world. I would like to make two blends as a gift (along with a diffuser) for my cousin who was newly diagnosed with breast cancer. I’d like one to be healing (I was thinking orange, lemongrass, thyme and frankincense). The other I’d like for her nausea (which I’d like to encorporate ginger and lemon). Do you have any advice?
Middle notes are like the “ties that bind” only they are binding your other essential oils together into a harmonized blend. These are the oils that complete your blend by balancing the light top notes with the deep base notes. The aroma of middle notes lasts longer than those of top notes, but not as long as base notes. These oils can vary in consistency and are often derived from whole herbs and spices.
Too bad valerian smells like stinky feet, because it really does the trick when it comes to getting a good nights rest. Valerian has been used in many different ways for centuries to reduce stress, tension and instill a sense of peace and tranquility. You’ll definitely want to mask this scent with a blend. While it is pricey, and a bit of an acquired smell, this is definitely one of the most effective essential oils for insomnia.
Research suggests topical application may actually be one of the most effective methods for people with sleep disorders as the chemical components of lavender have been shown to enter the blood stream within 5 minutes of massaging the oil on the skin. (4) The calming and relaxing effects of lavender essential oil have a one-two punch when applied topically because of the direct benefit on the brain when the volatile organic compounds are inhaled and through the skin! (4)
There are many essential oils that can help you get to sleep faster and treat insomnia. Scientific studies have revealed that essential oils such as lavender, valerian, chamomile (and many more) can help you fall asleep faster. In this article I am going to cover proven essential oil for better sleep, including essential oil blends to induce sleep.
I hear what you’re saying Scott, and I’m not disagreeing with you. I don’t know a whole lot about the process, but I do know that bigger companies follow harvesting, storage, and extracting guidelines that not all home distillers follow. I also know that bigger companies have their oils routinely tested by 3rd party labs to check them for certain things. Again, not all home distillers do that. I’m sure that’s why people trust bigger EO companies, but if I were making and selling my own oils from home, I’d be sure I did those things and shouted it from the rooftops so people would know my oils were top notch. Thanks for sharing your process!

I am sorry if this is offending, but why does DoTerra price their oils so high? I will never buy from them because I have used them and they are the same quality as all the other brands not greedy for money. For example: I can buy 100% pure (and I have this to compared to other brands, still work the best) Frankincense oil for about $14 for 4oz. But if I got DoTerra, that would cost me a hefty $558 wholesale. DoTerra retail for that would be even more, $744. That is 53x the price of the same quality oil I get. So is DoTerra really 53x better that what I get?

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