You’re totally right… I’m not a certified aromatherapist therefore I don’t treat or consult with people on EO use. However, I do share good info I’ve learned and a few recipes here and there. But, like you said, there’s good info out there to be learned, and I think it’s important for people to take the info (mine included) and go check it out with research of their own. There are people who are smart and self-taught in certain areas, but that doesn’t mean they’re perfect… we all need to double check things, you know.

Hi Meagan, I’m somewhat new to the EO world. I would like to make two blends as a gift (along with a diffuser) for my cousin who was newly diagnosed with breast cancer. I’d like one to be healing (I was thinking orange, lemongrass, thyme and frankincense). The other I’d like for her nausea (which I’d like to encorporate ginger and lemon). Do you have any advice?
First off though, and this is an always ALWAYS rule for me, NEVER ingest any essential oils. Regardless of what essential oil companies say, and what you may have heard around the internet, I still think there are serious health risks to ingesting essential oils, and I will soon write an article dedicated to just this topic. I never ingest any oils myself, my aromatherapy-certified friends agree, and I will never recommend this to you either. ALWAYS DILUTE essential oils with water (in a diffuser), or with a carrier oil (for topical application).
I was leery of buying essential oils without knowing the company and smelling the product. I'm very experienced with aromatherapy and essential oils and have even run an aromatherapy business so I'm pretty picky about them (no, not the pyramid scheme ones, this was well before those businesses.) I have studied aromatherapy extensively. I took a gamble and bought these as a gift for my daughter mainly because of the packaging and the price. I was very pleasantly surprised at the quality of the oils. They are definitely aromatherapy quality and NOT fake fragrance oils. Essential oils don't always smell sweet and pleasant. Rosemary and Frankincense will have a more woody earthy smell and aren't like a scented candle. Don't expect them to smell yummy. They are intended for therapeutic use. So, if you're wanting a pleasant scent, you'll have ... full review
You can definitley combine both, Elizabeth. The ratio is totally your choice depending on what helps you. One thing you could do would be to make two separate personal inhalers (one with rosemary and one with lavender) and take a few deep breaths of the rosemary as needed, then, if you start feeling too anxious, start using the lavender one to calm you a bit. Maybe try it BEFORE you take a test… like during a study session, to see if it helps or not. Best of luck in your studies… I remember a lot of late nights getting ready for those big tests!
If you’re reading this and live in an area that would be considered “modern” or “industrial,” there’s a 70% chance that you don’t get the sleep that you need every night. In America alone, an estimated 50 – 70 million people suffer from sleep disorders or sleep deprivation and we literally have an epidemic on our hands! What if I told you that using the best essential oils for sleep could help reverse this trend?
You might also want to ensure that your diffuser looks great in your home by pairing it with items that mesh well in color and texture. Or you may want your beautiful diffuser to stand alone as a centerpiece. Whatever you choose to do, you’ll find that it doesn’t take much to ensure get the most out of your diffusers. Now… some essential oil diffuser recipes!
To start figuring out why you’re suffering from poor sleep, it’s easiest if you reflect on your own sleep experiences. Have you ever had a bad night’s sleep that resulted in near physical exhaustion the next day? Is this perhaps a regular occurrence for you? If you’ve ever been in bed trying to sleep, tossing and turning for what seems like the entire night, it’s likely that you’ve experienced at least some level of insomnia.
Hi Diana. It sounds like you’re mixing carrier oils together which are totally fine and very good at nourishing the skin on their own. What I’m talking about here in this post is how to blend essential oil together to get a nice smell. This essential oil blend will then be added to the carrier oil(s) of your choice like those you mentioned in your comment. If you wanna learn more about blending essential oils based on their therapeutic properties and have them smell good too, check out this post I wrote on how to create therapeutic essential oil blends in 7 steps. Hope this helps some! Thanks for your comment!

Sure Dorie. So after you’ve got your essential oil blend, you can diffuse it at home to get it into the air or you can just open the bottle and sniff it from time to time. That’s two great ways to use EOs safely… assuming the oils are appropriate for your son’s age. For school, the best bet is to dilute the EO blend in a carrier oil (like jojoba oil) and put it in a 1 oz. glass bottle with a roller top. That way it’s easy to apply. Simply rub a little bit on the insides of the wrist, behind the ears, the temple area, or the neck and you should be able to absorb it into the skin slowly as well as smell it for a bit. Hope that helps!! Let me know if you have any other questions!
I’m so so sorry Diana, but I’m definitely not a perfumist. That blend sounds awesome… like something I’d definitely wear, but I’m no help. This article is a basis how to on how to blend… I don’t know enough about the smells of individual oils to be able to tell you what you’re missing and how much of each oil to use. You’ll just have to experiment and see or consult with someone who makes essential oil perfumes. Thanks!

LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
Like most people I am new to mixing EO’s. First, I would like to say thank you for all your time and hard work you put into this article. Most people don’t realize how much time goes into the trial and error process. It seems you have done a lot of hard work and a good job for us all to take into consideration. I would like to know if you have to rest it 24 hours if you are going to be putting it in an oil burner or a diffuser? I would be mixing something for calming and concentration. I homeschool and my DD needs something to help her stay focused and my patience is being test greatly right now.
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Yes, vegetable oils or other forms of fat are the best way to properly dilute essential oils. I believe some aromatherapists say that mixing EOs with heavy whipping cream and adding that to baths is acceptable and safe as the fat in the cream helps disperse the oil, but as far as putting EOs on your skin goes… diluting them in a carrier oil is best. You can find some oils that aren’t greasy. I believe they’re called “dry oils.” Rosehip seed oil is an example, and there are several others. Maybe Google it to get some other examples. Hope this answers your question.
You don't have to rely on habit forming sedatives or over the counter  Benadryl & Tylenol (Tylenol PM) to get to sleep. Sleep issues are most often underlying symptoms from other health issues. Before you chug down pills to cover up your chronic sleep problem, you might try making some of these changes in your life first, to see what helps you get a better night's rest:
Our sense of smell is directly wired to the brain’s centers of memory and emotion. Cells inside the nose detect smells in our environment, and send information to the brain, via the olfactory nerve. (We also have a cluster of cells the top of the throat that detect scents from the food we consume, and pass that information along the same olfactory channel to the brain.) The information about smell does immediately to the limbic system of the brain, which includes regions like the amygdala that control emotional reactions and memory.  
While some of the causes of sleep disorders cannot be controlled or mitigated by essential oils, the soothing and relaxing qualities of these oils can help calm the body and mind, making it easier for people to find restful sleep. This is due to the sedative, anxiolytic, anti-depressant, soothing, warming, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties of these essential oils.
It’s best to start slowly. Start with 8-10 drops of essential oils in the diffuser. Over time, you could add more as needed, up to about 15 drops or as directed on your diffuser product manual. You can diffuse for as little as 15 minutes or a few hours. Set up the diffuser in your bedroom and let it run all night for a restful night’s sleep. You can run a diffuser in a child’s room too but be sure to use oils that are suitable for kids and leave the door open so the room can air out.
I really enjoyed this post and then I read you’re bio at the end and I liked it even more. I’m about 5 years late in reading it but better late than never. I am new to blending and have been reading whatever I can about techniques and I think your input has really helped me embrace the fact that this is as much of an art as it is a science and although there is a lot of chemistry involved, intuition and patience play a big role in it too. It’s really helped me prioritize what I want to accomplish and this article even helped make blending a little less intimidating/overwhelming. Thank you again for your help and God bless!!
Hi Zeyad, I’m not sure I understand what you’re asking in your first question. Are you wanting to know how much of the essential oil you add to the alcohol? It would depend on what you’re using this blend for and at what strength you want it. As far as how to get it to stay on your clothes for a long time, that too will depend on the blend and the strength. Make sure you’re using each of the three notes in your blend. Remember the base note oil is the one that will linger the longest. Also, the dilution percentage will matter. The stronger the dilution, the more it will smell. For example a 1% dilution won’t smell as strong as a 3% dilution will. Hope that helps more!
Aaaah… sleep! Such a popular and much talked about topic. Lack of sleep can be harmful to any individual’s health and well-being, while adequate sleep assists in the retention of stamina and provision of energy that fuels you to function all day long. With an increase in everyday stress levels, hypertension, and the overall pace of life, individuals are resorting to all sorts of things to help improve sleep.

CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
Fortunately, smelling it is not necessary for all benefits. Often smelling a certain essential oil will affect your mood, but other effects are incurred just by getting it in your system by way of your skin, breathing it into your lungs, or ingesting it. The largest pores on your body are on the bottoms of your feet (I know! Go figure!) and that’s often how I apply my oils (mixed with almond or grape seed or coconut oil).
First off though, and this is an always ALWAYS rule for me, NEVER ingest any essential oils. Regardless of what essential oil companies say, and what you may have heard around the internet, I still think there are serious health risks to ingesting essential oils, and I will soon write an article dedicated to just this topic. I never ingest any oils myself, my aromatherapy-certified friends agree, and I will never recommend this to you either. ALWAYS DILUTE essential oils with water (in a diffuser), or with a carrier oil (for topical application).
The truth is, Lavender really is an all-star essential oil. It is extremely versatile. It is most commonly known for it relaxing effects on the body and mind. With that, the main effect of lavender can be further summarized in an ability to eliminate nervous tension of all kinds. This means that lavender can help with relaxation; it can relieve pain symptoms, enhance blood circulation, disinfect the skin, and treat respiratory problems. Even the name lavender comes from the latin word “Lavare”, which  means “to wash”, derived from its particularly clean aroma.

I was introduced to dottera oils 4 years ago. I have also used other oils for diffusing. There is a huge difference between oils in my opinion. Although various oil manufacturers claim to be 100% pure you can tell the difference as compared to dottera which has purity in scent. Many oils have carrier oils added to them so although they claim to be pure they are not. Also dottera oils are therapeutic grade and many can be ingested safely. I believe if you are going to inhale a substance it should be 100% pure with no additives. As a nurse I know this is important. Just my opinion.

I’ve used YL oils only a few times whereas I’ve used EG oils much, much more, and honestly I’ve not noticed much of a difference. Maybe it’s because I wasn’t paying attention though. I think YL has great products… their seed to seal promise is reassuring, but I don’t think they’re the “best” or “only” EO company out there. I’ve been very happy with EG oils. I’ve recently tried Plant Therapy oils, and I’m really happy with those. I have a Q&A with that company coming ups soon so stay tuned as it will give you more info on them. All this goes to say, I’d personally try some other EO brands like Plant Therapy or Mountain Rose Herbs before I’d pay the high prices and commit myself to YL. If I wasn’t happy with any of the others companies or oils, then I’d go for YL. We each like different things and there’s really no “wrong” brand. Do what works for you and you feel is best. Everyone is welcome here. I’m not committed to one company. I just what has worked best for me. Currently it’s EG, but that could change as I find other companies I like. I hope this answers your question Jessica and is helpful to you!


The benefits of neroli essential oil include having sedative, anti-anxiety and calming properties. A 2013 study combined a mixture of lavender, neroli and chamomile essential oils to examine the impact of aromatherapy on the quality of sleep among participants in an intensive care unit. Patients were instructed to inhale the aroma for several minutes. The mixture was then applied to a stone and placed under the patient’s pillowcase overnight.
Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.
Thank you SO MUCH for your information in regards to the so called “therapeutic Essential Oils” I long suspected there was no such thing and it is a Marketing ploy for these two companies in question as well, I have been personally challenged by doTERRA consultants because my Essential oils are much cheaper than theirs, but I purchase Pure essential oils, bottle and resell, I have had no complaints in 17 years, your information has helped me feel much more secure in what I am doing?Kind regards Linda

Hi Kristi! I wouldn’t necessarily run all at the same time with different blends as it could just be too much for your sense of smell, unless they are in different rooms and you won’t notice the scent from another room. I do have one in my bedroom and another in my kitchen area and almost always have different blends in them, although usually they aren’t running simultaneously since I’m not in both of the rooms at the same time. I also have one in the kids room where I’ll run some soothing blends in there for a little while before they go to sleep 🙂
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