Next, place the diffuser below eye level. The aroma from your diffuser will rise on its own, so placing your diffuser in an area above your nose will prevent you from ever enjoying your oils. It’s also recommended that you place your diffuser in the center of the room, because the oil diffuses in a radial diameter. In other words, placing the diffuser in a corner of the room may cause the oil to hit the wall and rise upwards, reducing diffusion. However, if you don’t have an outlet in the center of your living room (like most people) just place your diffuser away from the wall.
Disclaimer: The information on Don’t Mess with Mama is for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice. I am not a medical professional and the information contained on this blog should not be used to diagnose, treat or prevent any disease or health illness. Consult with a qualified health care professional before acting on any information presented here.
You’re totally right… I’m not a certified aromatherapist therefore I don’t treat or consult with people on EO use. However, I do share good info I’ve learned and a few recipes here and there. But, like you said, there’s good info out there to be learned, and I think it’s important for people to take the info (mine included) and go check it out with research of their own. There are people who are smart and self-taught in certain areas, but that doesn’t mean they’re perfect… we all need to double check things, you know.
Wonderful blog site! I just jumped into this EO stuff this week, with little forethought. I wanted some natural bug repellent solutions for my dogs and my family. Next thing I know, I have ordered lots of ingredients and am finding myself getting to get into this. My husband said if I start stirring a big black couldron and cackling, he will start worrying. Lol. I told him Eye of Newt doesn’t seem to be available in an EO, so not to worry.
Hey Gabriela! I can’t speak from experience here because I’ve never made my own candles, but I too have heard that essential oils don’t work as well as fragrance oils in candles. No matter, I’d personally use them over fragrance oils. As far as the jasmine absolute… I don’t think you will get the scent you’re going for if you use any essential oil that’s already diluted in a carrier oil like the jojoba oil in this case. You need the concentrated oil. And yes, I’d still think the 30-50-20 rule would still apply if you want a rounded blend. Hope that helps… some!

The great thing about these recipes, is that you can experiment and change them based on what you like! So if you start with the recipe, but find you need more, you can add in more! My diffusers are all mid-size and hold between 100-150 ml of water. These recipes are based on that size (most home diffusers are similar in size). You can still use these recipes with yours! If you find you need to add more oil since you’re adding more water, add in a few extra drops of each and see how that does for you. Sometimes in a large open space I find that I need to add in a little more myself. 😉 Hope that helps… have you tried any yet?? I’d love to hear which ones you like!
Now that you are familiar with the specific effects of essential oils, you can identify your own sleep problem and test some blends that target that problem alone. For example, a blend of orange oil to relax muscles and cedarwood oil to reduce automatic motor activity could be a powerful intervention against restless legs syndrome. Alternatively, you can mix oils that have a variety of effects to improve all aspects of sleep.
I found you while searching for information about essential oils. You have a really neat site and with tons of great and valuable information that helps me a lot. I have been using essential oils for some time now, specially for cleaning around my home and for room sprays . I am now making soy candles but I am using essential oils instead of fragrance oils, even though some says that essential oils doesn’t have a very good scent throw in candles. My question for you is, Can I use jasmine absolute in jojoba oil for scent my wax? And what will be the ratio for blending in 6oz of soy wax? Would the 30-50-20 rule apply the same for blending essential oils for candles?
Well, they may be the same type of essential oil, but quality can be different among companies. Now I’m not one to jump on the bandwagon of one brand over another, but the reason I listed the YL and doTERRA as internal and the others as external is because that’s how they market their products… not because I say it’s okay or even use them that way. As I said in the post, I don’t use EOs internally… I’ve never needed to, but if I were going to, I’d probably go with one of these two brands over some of the other ones. If you wanna see comparisons of EO brands, check out Lea Harris’ site – Learning About EOs – she has testing done of many of the major brands and compares them to each other. It’s very interested when you are concerned about quality. Hope that answers your question… thank you!
Hi Kristi! I wouldn’t necessarily run all at the same time with different blends as it could just be too much for your sense of smell, unless they are in different rooms and you won’t notice the scent from another room. I do have one in my bedroom and another in my kitchen area and almost always have different blends in them, although usually they aren’t running simultaneously since I’m not in both of the rooms at the same time. I also have one in the kids room where I’ll run some soothing blends in there for a little while before they go to sleep 🙂
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As far as the spruce goes though, I’d personally leave it out. I don’t know a lot about it except that it contains thujone which can be toxic to the body in large doses and cause nervous system issues. Since you’re using a lot of this oil over a long period of time… I’d just leave it out. The only respiratory benefit I found on it was to reduce coughing and you already have plenty of other oils in your blend that will also do that. So to me, it’s better to leave it out… especially for a young child.

If your question is which essential oil to use for getting a better night’s rest, I will have a few recommendations for you! But please know that essential oils are an individual choice, and even if one particular oil works for you, doesn’t mean that it will work for the rest of your family and friends just the same. Each person’s natural health is a very individual thing and you might have to try a few oils first until you find that perfect match for you, that gives you the results you’re after.
Superior Quality: We source only the finest quality essential oils from highly regarded suppliers and distillers from around the world. Many of our oils are steam-distilled or cold-pressed, therefore retaining the essential odor, aroma, taste, medicinal, and therapeutic properties of the plant, resulting in a superior quality, and highly concentrated essence.
I just happened upon your site and I really like it. Everything is researched and well written. I’m saving this to come back again 🙂 I totally agree with you on cost not necessarily reflecting the quality of oil. While I agree that a low cost essential oil will usually indicate an adulteration, there are many smaller companies that have pure essential oils with reasonable prices.
A question that you may or may not be able to help me with. . . I am trying to make a citrus blend to use in soap. I think I have the blend of EOs that I want to use. What I am not sure about is diluting it in a carrier oil. How diluted should I make it? Or should I not dilute it at all so it is strong enough to make it through the soap process? Thanks for any help!
Essential oils can act by triggering the central nervous system and circulatory system to promote sleep in the body. To test these effects, an increasing amount of scientific studies have been conducted to evaluate their effectiveness on humans. The following are considered the best essential oils for sleep due to their sedative, calming or stress-reducing properties.
This makes smell unique among our senses. Information we take in from our other senses travels first to another region of the brain, the thalamus, which acts as a relay station, passing along sensory data to the other parts of the brain that produce our sensory perceptions. Only smell moves directly to the brain’s emotion and memory center. That’s why those memories you associate with the scent of garden roses, or banana bread baking in the oven, come on so quickly and so strongly.
Information and statements about the products on this site have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. You should not use the information contained herein for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or for prescribing any medication. We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using any herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.
Like lavender and roman chamomile essential oils, sweet marjoram essential oil combined together with the previous oils can produce a highly effective synergistic blend for insomnia. You should certainly be able to start feeling the benefit of a better nights sleep after you use these oils. Blend these three oils in different proportions to suit your personal preferences for fragrance, or check my recommended blend recipes below.
All information contained within this site is for reference purposes only and are not intended to substitute the advice given by a pharmacist, physician, or any other licensed health-care professional. Organic Infusions products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any health condition or disease.
First off though, and this is an always ALWAYS rule for me, NEVER ingest any essential oils. Regardless of what essential oil companies say, and what you may have heard around the internet, I still think there are serious health risks to ingesting essential oils, and I will soon write an article dedicated to just this topic. I never ingest any oils myself, my aromatherapy-certified friends agree, and I will never recommend this to you either. ALWAYS DILUTE essential oils with water (in a diffuser), or with a carrier oil (for topical application).
The great thing about these recipes, is that you can experiment and change them based on what you like! So if you start with the recipe, but find you need more, you can add in more! My diffusers are all mid-size and hold between 100-150 ml of water. These recipes are based on that size (most home diffusers are similar in size). You can still use these recipes with yours! If you find you need to add more oil since you’re adding more water, add in a few extra drops of each and see how that does for you. Sometimes in a large open space I find that I need to add in a little more myself. 😉 Hope that helps… have you tried any yet?? I’d love to hear which ones you like!

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Thank you SO MUCH for your information in regards to the so called “therapeutic Essential Oils” I long suspected there was no such thing and it is a Marketing ploy for these two companies in question as well, I have been personally challenged by doTERRA consultants because my Essential oils are much cheaper than theirs, but I purchase Pure essential oils, bottle and resell, I have had no complaints in 17 years, your information has helped me feel much more secure in what I am doing?Kind regards Linda
The bottoms of feet are extremely effective places for absorption – probably because they are usually warm and moist. Always dilute E-oils with a carrier oil. Most advise a 2 – 3% dilution for TOPICAL use on adults (much too strong for children): 2% dilution = 6 drops of E-oil/TBL of carrier oil; 3% dilution = 9 drops of E-oil/TBL of C-oil. SHAKE WELL before applying. Until you decide whether you like a particular blend or not, best to mix up small batches.
Spring for a good mattress. Pun intended! Again, it may seem obvious, but the mattress and pillows you use can make a huge difference in how well you sleep. Most mattresses have a lifespan of 9-10 years, if it’s good quality. Pillows can become worn out, too. Many advances have been made in the arena of memory and gel foam. Your sleep is a worthy investment in your health, not just a luxury.
Hi Meagan, Thanks for sharing, you really broke the process down in an easy to understand way. Wish I had the oils you used in the example so I could try it out. I’m going to read more of your blog. I do have a question though, I think you said you’ve used Eden’s Garden and Young Living. I’ve been using Eden’s Garden for 2 years now and since I never tried anything else I am very satisfied, just needed an opinion from someone else to help me in my research. Today I went to a class and made YL Thieves Disinfectant spray. All the oils she let us smell seemed more fragrant than my EG EOs, I was wondering if you ever noticed that and what may be the reason. I’m not sure how oils are “supposed” to smell, only that I did notice a slight difference.
All citrus oils are are produced by way of cold-pressing, or extracting, essential oils out of the rind of the fruit. I always advocate for organic citrus essential oils because they are sure to contain less pesticides and other chemical byproducts used in the agriculture of growing the plants. Spraying fruit trees against insects, viruses and other naturally occurring diseases leaves chemical residue on the rind of the fruits. Certainly, these chemicals must find their way into the essential oils product as well. I always purchase organic citrus oils. A beautiful variety of sweet orange essential oil is this one here by NOW essentials.
Hi Rachael. Great questions! Those high dilution rates (20% and 10%) are just so you can smell your EO blend mixed with a carrier oil to see if you like it or not. All carrier oils smell different, and they can effect how your blend smells in the end. That’s why I recommend testing your EO blends in different carrier oils at different dilutions to see what you like best. And, because the smells of EO blends change depending on what they’re mixed with, it’s always a good idea to test them in small batches before making bigger batches (hence using drops and not teaspoons or ounces!). Once you know what you like, you can then move on to making larger amounts of preblended oils (EO blend + carrier oil) for skin application using a lower dilution rate (3-5% for adults and anywhere from .25-1% for children depending on their age). This is my article on using EOs for children safely. There is a lot of different opinions on using EOs for kids. Since I’m not a trained aromatherapist, I tend to take the safe route with it comes to EOs. Hope this helps answer your questions a bit!! PS. Just for the record, higher dilution rates are often used in bath products (body wash, shampoo, shave creams, etc.) as they don’t sit on the skin, but are washed off fairly quickly. This decreases the amount of EO absorption you would have, therefore, higher percentages of EOs can go in those products so they smell stronger.

I hear you Jill… I did the same thing except I used other oils that were more fragrant so I had to use WAY more essential oils than I originally thought I would. Now, this was my first sugar scrub too so I’m not an expert. In fact, I’d rather direct you to my friend Stacy over at A Delightful Home as she’s written an ebook all about making scrubs as gifts so she knows way more about that than I do. As far as the smell being off… I let my scrubs set a bit and then they smelled better and everyone who received them loved them. Also, you could try adding in more sugar to see if it cuts the smell a little. I’d wait on adding more coconut oil because that can get your scrub to oily. Anyway, sorry I couldn’t be of more help. Definitely check out Stacy’s blog.
Now that you are familiar with the specific effects of essential oils, you can identify your own sleep problem and test some blends that target that problem alone. For example, a blend of orange oil to relax muscles and cedarwood oil to reduce automatic motor activity could be a powerful intervention against restless legs syndrome. Alternatively, you can mix oils that have a variety of effects to improve all aspects of sleep.
This is a crude list… a rough draft of sorts. You will not be using all of the essential oils you put on this list, and you are not concerning yourself with essential oil brands at this point. You’re basically gathering a lot of ideas and information here. The idea is to come up with a list of 10-20 essential oils to get you started, and as you progress through the steps for blending essential oils, you’ll begin to simplify this big list.
The use of essential oils for medicinal purposes has an ancient history, going back to early Egyptian, Chinese, and Roman societies. Ever hear of the Hippocratic Oath? That’s the ethical pledge taken by physicians for centuries (now, often taken by students upon graduation from medical school). It’s named for Greek physician, Hippocrates, who studied the effects of essential oils and was a proponent of their healing, health-promoting properties.

srrryy i forgot to tell that im talkin about essential oils and im using three oils for this purpose lavender bcoz of its good soothing frangrance and as well as mosquito repellent property and the other two are eucalyptus essential oil and clove oil which has great mosquito repellent need your help how to mix it and use it. it may be chances that after mixing these oils only aroma will come and the other property of mpsquito repellent will not work or may be aftr mixing aroma can be effectd so which mixing of which oil give optimum performance i need help about it give your suggestion plzzzz
Clary sage essential oil – Containing some of the same properties as valerian, clary sage is a very effective sedative. In fact, when studied in comparison to lavender, chamomile, and rosemary, for the strongest anti-stressor, clary sage leads the pack and beat them all out. I love the relaxant properties of clary sage so much that I like to use it in both my Aunt Flo's Soothing Salve and my Don't Worry Be Happy anti-anxiety blend!
Hypnotic use has been associated with a 35% increase in developing cancer, and patients receiving hypnotics are more than 4 times likely to die than people who are not on the drugs. It appears that the dosage plays a key role, but “even patients prescribed fewer than 18 hypnotic doses per year experienced increased mortality, with greater mortality associated with greater dosage prescribed.” (3)
I use them in my water all the time…I only add oils to water in a glass container and I always shake the container before I take a drink and that way the oils momentarily mix and I am not getting a gulp of the oil floating on the top. That also happened to me when I first tried adding the drops of oil to my water. But now it does not happen any more because I am just in the habit of mixing right before I take a drink. Hope this is helpful.
As far as the testing goes… I don’t know much about it other than I think she did opt for more expensive and more accurate testing the 2nd and 3rd time she had oils tested. I’m not sure on that though. All I know is that her tests got a lot of attention… much of which brought about changes from some of the bigger EO companies so she must have done something right.

I almost always give my kids baths in the evening (same goes for me) as a way to relax before bed so we use a lot of relaxing oils like lavender and chamomile or grounding oils like patchouli and vetiver. If I give them a bath in the middle of the day for some reason I’ll use more uplifting/energizing oils. Citrus oils mostly, but there are others that work great in those blends too like mint oils. Of course I’m always careful about safety precautions with EOs and using the correct ones with my kids. Best of luck with your bath melts. I’ve never tried those before so I’ll have to put that on my to-do list. They look wonderful!
It is even simple to put together the massage oil blend to do it.  Giving yourself a neck and shoulder massage doesn’t have to be complicated either.  You simply apply a small amount of the massage oil to your neck and gently massage it in.  You can learn how to give a more involved self-massage by watching great tutorials on YouTube, but what matters is mostly getting the essential oils on your skin.
All citrus oils are are produced by way of cold-pressing, or extracting, essential oils out of the rind of the fruit. I always advocate for organic citrus essential oils because they are sure to contain less pesticides and other chemical byproducts used in the agriculture of growing the plants. Spraying fruit trees against insects, viruses and other naturally occurring diseases leaves chemical residue on the rind of the fruits. Certainly, these chemicals must find their way into the essential oils product as well. I always purchase organic citrus oils. A beautiful variety of sweet orange essential oil is this one here by NOW essentials.
Oh, lavender essential oil is great, and I’d definitely consider it a go-to oil. It’s an easy one for beginners to use, it’s mostly safe, and it has a lot of different uses. I didn’t exclude it from the list for any particular reason. I just went through and tried to select oils with different notes so people would have a good variety of EO choices when making their blends. Hope that answers your question!
I’m new to this and I just purchased my first essential oil from the “now” brand. I wanted to make my own body butter so I also purchased coconut oil, almond oil, and Shea butter…. I wanted orange scent but when it arrived it said “do not use on skin”. I thought essential oils were used to make lotions and body butters? I’m confused. Can you help please? Thank you, ?
Well, aromatherapy (or smelling essential oils) can do the same thing. They can help to support your mood and emotions. Think about how you feel when you smell a fresh-cut lemon or how about Lavender from the garden? Maybe energized from the lemon and relaxed with the lavender? Well, it’s no surprise. Essential oils are highly concentrated aromatic essences of those plants. That’s why smelling them is a really effective way of using essential oils. This is called aromatic use. Be sure to check out How to Support Emotions with Essential Oils.
Unlike common sleep aids and benzodiazepines, there are virtually no side effects when people use essential oils for sleeping. In the words of a 2014 systematic review of the literature, “A majority of the study findings suggested a positive effect of essential oils for sleep. Lavender was the most frequently studied essential oil. No adverse events were reported.” (5)
I’m so so sorry Diana, but I’m definitely not a perfumist. That blend sounds awesome… like something I’d definitely wear, but I’m no help. This article is a basis how to on how to blend… I don’t know enough about the smells of individual oils to be able to tell you what you’re missing and how much of each oil to use. You’ll just have to experiment and see or consult with someone who makes essential oil perfumes. Thanks!
I love lavender and chamomile for their calming and relaxing properties. We too use them a lot. I love making fabric sprays with some vodka, water, and eos and spritzing the sheets and pillows. It doesn’t smell of alcohol and my kids can do it before bed which is fun for them. Plus it dilutes the oils so I don’t have to worry about them being too strong for them. I love that lavender and chamomile are even safe for young babies! Thanks for the tip!

After testing your blend, if you like the scent and how it makes you feel, go with it. You can now make more of your blend, using larger amounts of oils, before bottling it up and labeling it. If you don’t like the scent or it doesn’t affect you the way you hoped it would, you can start the process over varying the amount of essential oils used or you can chose different oils all together.


Tracey Black, founder and CEO of Don’t Mess with Mama, started blogging to share her family’s gluten-free and natural living journey. At DontMesswithMama.com, she shares how simple it can be to live a more natural lifestyle. Here you’ll find gluten-free recipes, green cleaning tips, DIY and homemade tutorials, minimalism tips and so much more! Tracey is also the author of the books Natural Beauty Made Simple, Instant Pot Recipes Made Simple and Gluten-Free Recipes Your Family Will Love.
All information on The Hippy Homemaker is meant for educational and informational purposes only. The statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Products and/or information are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease. Readers are advised to do their own research and make decisions in partnership with their health care provider. If you are pregnant, nursing, have a medical condition or are taking any medication, please consult your physician.
Disclaimer: The information on Don’t Mess with Mama is for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice. I am not a medical professional and the information contained on this blog should not be used to diagnose, treat or prevent any disease or health illness. Consult with a qualified health care professional before acting on any information presented here.
I really enjoyed this post and then I read you’re bio at the end and I liked it even more. I’m about 5 years late in reading it but better late than never. I am new to blending and have been reading whatever I can about techniques and I think your input has really helped me embrace the fact that this is as much of an art as it is a science and although there is a lot of chemistry involved, intuition and patience play a big role in it too. It’s really helped me prioritize what I want to accomplish and this article even helped make blending a little less intimidating/overwhelming. Thank you again for your help and God bless!!
Like lavender and roman chamomile essential oils, sweet marjoram essential oil combined together with the previous oils can produce a highly effective synergistic blend for insomnia. You should certainly be able to start feeling the benefit of a better nights sleep after you use these oils. Blend these three oils in different proportions to suit your personal preferences for fragrance, or check my recommended blend recipes below.
No that was my question! I was worried those smells wouldn’t blend properly (Lavender as the primary + rosemary with a touch of oak moss which i know will be hard with oak moss absolute as being thick!-I’ve been warned thicker than vetiver!) and the idea of the dried herbs(rosemary and lavender) in jasmine rice together… would I get lucky on any advice for mixing those oils with a general ratio in mind or if my OG idea of drop count sounded possibly safe?
Sleep deficiency may start suddenly or may slowly become a habit over time. On a day-to-day basis, sleep deficiency can affect learning, memory recall, decision making, the ability to deal with change, and how we express our emotions or behaviors. Chronic sleep deficiency can increase the risk of certain health problems, such as obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.1

A question that you may or may not be able to help me with. . . I am trying to make a citrus blend to use in soap. I think I have the blend of EOs that I want to use. What I am not sure about is diluting it in a carrier oil. How diluted should I make it? Or should I not dilute it at all so it is strong enough to make it through the soap process? Thanks for any help!
Smelling Salts – This is just another way to keep a sniffer around with you on-the-go. In a 10 ml (1/3 oz.) glass bottle, add 30 drops of the essential oil blend and fill the remainder of the bottle with either fine or coarse sea salt. Waft the bottle under your nose while taking deep inhalations whenever you feel are needing to shut your mind off and fall asleep.
As far as the spruce goes though, I’d personally leave it out. I don’t know a lot about it except that it contains thujone which can be toxic to the body in large doses and cause nervous system issues. Since you’re using a lot of this oil over a long period of time… I’d just leave it out. The only respiratory benefit I found on it was to reduce coughing and you already have plenty of other oils in your blend that will also do that. So to me, it’s better to leave it out… especially for a young child.
There are several benefits of lavender essential oil including its sedative, anti-anxiety and stress reducing properties. Several studies have indicated that using lavender essential oil for sleep may help slow down the central nervous system activity. The resulting calming effect may cause a person to have better quality of sleep, reduced anxiety and improve overall mood.
In a study of cancer patients published in 2016, researchers found 64% reported improved sleep using “aromasticks” that included frankincense. One of the reasons frankincense essential oil may be so useful for helping sleep is its studied benefits for pain. A 2004 study published in Thailand reported oil of frankincense as one of the oils found to reduce both pain and anxiety in women in childbirth.
Thank you for your question! Organixx Essential Oils are some of the purest and most effective oils in the world. They are 100% Certified USDA Organic, derived from the world’s best plant sources, and non-GMO which you would be very hard pressed to find in other oils, even if they are high grade. We also offer our Essential Oils at a much lower price point than other popular high end brands. For much more information, please take a look here: https://shop.organixx.com/products/essential-oils
Hello! I love this article. So helpful. I am blending some oils for diffusers and used this article to help me formulate a blend to promote clear breathing. It has lemongrass, rosemary, eucaliptus and incense. I used your suggested ratios for top and bottom notes and it smells lovely. But something weird happens! The smell kind of disappears after you first smell it. It’s almost as if this particular blend kind of blocks the olfactory nerves or something, because after the first smell I can hardly smell it at all. My husband and friend tested it for me and something similar happens to them. Do you have any ideas why this might happen? At first I thought I made the blend too weak, but then I realized that the first sniff was great and after that it receded to nothing. Any thoughts?
When it comes to blending essential oils, it’s recommended to start with three essential oils in a blend until you’re familiar and comfortable with the blending process. From there you can go up to five essential oils in a blend and then up to nine. Rarely will you find more than nine aromas in one blend as that is typically reserved for perfumists!
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
Hi Jorge… I don’t know anything specifically about beard oil… I’m assuming you’re looking for a scent combination and that will vary from person to person. If you purchase the essential oils you listed above and try them out in different combinations like the post suggests, I’m sure you’ll come up with a blend you’ll love. As of right now, I don’t do individualized consultations. I’m so sorry, but best of luck!
Hi Megan! I’m new to oils, and I’m looking specifically for oils that help with anxiety, depression, insomnia, and colds/flu. I have right now sweet orange, lemongrass, frankincense, tea tree, peppermint, rosemary, eucalyptus, and lavender. Could you offer some direction/advice on where to start with what I have? I would be using them by diffusing with a diffuser or using the steam from taking a shower if that helps. Thanks!

First, thank you so much for posting these blends! I am so eager to try them. May I ask though – how does the size of your diffuser (and it’s water capacity) matter to the oil amounts in each ‘recipe’? For instance, my daughter has a smaller diffuser than me. Her’s holds a total of 120 ml. Mine on the other hand holds up to 300 ml. I almost never fill it to capacity with water, but it did start me wondering what water amount these blends were based upon.
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