Real sandalwood is hard to come by these days, because the Indian government’s export limitations, but if you can get your hands on it, and suffer from insomnia-snatch it up! This delightful aroma really helps reduce anxiety and stress all while promoting relaxation. It has been used for over 4 millennia all over the world for its comforting, therapeutic properties and wonderful smell.
I’ve never used it before, Joan, but I would imagine a little would go a long way and that it would be a great addition to muscle blends! I’d also guess it would fall into the “spicy” category of essential oils, and I would also decrease its total amount in any blend I made it in as it’s probably a very strong oil. I do use cayenne along with some other essential oils in the muscle rub blend that I make for my medicine cabinet. You can find that recipe in my How To Make Herbal Ointments, Salves, and Balms: The Ultimate How-To Guide if you’re interested.
Sleep is one of the most important and restorative processes for our body, and when we don’t get a proper amount of restful, uninterrupted sleep that we need, there are quite a few negative effects on our overall health. Fortunately, there are many excellent essential oils for sleep, which can leave you refreshed, rested and ready to face the world.
Our house is always being filled with relaxing and refreshing essential oils from out diffuser. I was extremely satisfied with the oils we received. Great value and very well packaged. I have ordered from other places and some have shown up broken in the box which makes for a very messy clean up and strong smell with these oils. This was not the case from this company and very pleased. You definitely have a repeat customer here. Thanks for your product and great service.
For depression: Depression and sleep problems often go hand in hand. A number of studies have examined the effects of aromatherapy using essential oils in people with depression and depressive symptoms, both with and without anxiety. Aromatherapy can help improve depressive symptoms, according to the results of several studies. A study found aromatherapy improved both depression and anxiety in a group of post-partum women. And a 2016 analysis found aromatherapy effective in reducing stress and depression—as well as symptoms of menopause—in middle-aged women.

This blending ratio doesn’t have a drop limit, but keep in mind that you want your blend to stay small so you don’t waste your oils (in case you don’t like it). You’ll be keeping track of your essential oils and drops on paper. This blending ratio works well with pure combinations (essential oils from one category) and mixed combinations (essential oils from complementary categories).
I’m a massage therapist and also a user of EOs. I really enjoyed reading this. I found it to be very helpful in understanding EOs and how to blend them by notes and by and by categories. This has been the most in depth I have seen anyone get into usage and blending. I apreciate how positive you are towards all brands of oils. I have bookmarked your page and will be back for more information.
There are many essential oils that can help you get to sleep faster and treat insomnia. Scientific studies have revealed that essential oils such as lavender, valerian, chamomile (and many more) can help you fall asleep faster. In this article I am going to cover proven essential oil for better sleep, including essential oil blends to induce sleep.
When creating essential oil blends, the ratio I almost always follow is what I call the “30-50-20 Rule.” This is an essential oil blending ratio where you use 30% of your top note oil, 50% of your middle note oil, and 20% of your base note oil in your blend. This blending ratio consists of 10 total drops of essential oils, totaling 100% once combined.

Here in California, where my family and I live, we’re treated to a bountiful, year-round explosion of plant life. The bright citrus trees, the blooming roses, the clusters of flowering lavender plants all make for amazing sights—and scents. But you don’t have to live in Southern California to enjoy these fragrant smells, or to get the benefits that they can deliver to sleep and mood.  
Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.
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All citrus oils are are produced by way of cold-pressing, or extracting, essential oils out of the rind of the fruit. I always advocate for organic citrus essential oils because they are sure to contain less pesticides and other chemical byproducts used in the agriculture of growing the plants. Spraying fruit trees against insects, viruses and other naturally occurring diseases leaves chemical residue on the rind of the fruits. Certainly, these chemicals must find their way into the essential oils product as well. I always purchase organic citrus oils. A beautiful variety of sweet orange essential oil is this one here by NOW essentials.

I have done extensive research on essential oils. NO oil should ever be injested. There are only a few food grade oils that can be injested. There is no such thing a therapeutic grade oil. Do more research. Many companies claim 100% pure and that may be, it’s the process that makes them unpure. If you want the real thing you must only buy USDA ORGANIC. The process is guaranteed minimal. No machinery so you not getting metals in your oil which is harmful to us. I hope this helps.


Hi Jorge… I don’t know anything specifically about beard oil… I’m assuming you’re looking for a scent combination and that will vary from person to person. If you purchase the essential oils you listed above and try them out in different combinations like the post suggests, I’m sure you’ll come up with a blend you’ll love. As of right now, I don’t do individualized consultations. I’m so sorry, but best of luck!
Assess your sleeping space. It may seem obvious but your bedroom needs to promote a good night’s sleep! This includes evaluating the temperature, with the National Sleep Foundation suggesting a cool 60-67 degrees F being optimal. Noise (including your partner’s snoring) should be diminished as much as possible. Consider ear plugs, white noise machines, and other devices to block out sounds. To make the room as dark as possible, consider blackout curtains and eye covers/shades. Also be aware of allergens. A good air purifier can make a world of difference if you are sensitive.
Thank you so much for this information, and the links you have provided. I’m new to this whole world of oils and thoroughly confused. One of my 9 year old sons has ADHD, Autism, severe anxiety and phobias, and a severe peanut allergy. On top of all of that he has a higher heart rate due to the anxiety and phobias setting everything else off, and cannot take any medications to help calm him down. He goes to therapy and social skills twice a week and has TSS workers at home and at school, but he still suffers and I needed to find something to help him without modern medicines in the mix. As it turns out, his therapy center is directly next door to a place called Penn Herb Company, so we ventured in to inquire about alternatives. He took a big sniff when we went in and I could see him relax. They helped me get a small stash of relaxing oils and make him a “calm down potion.” It worked every time I tried it on him before full meltdown. I am now on a mission to help him and the whole family get better without chemical medicines, but cannot spend hours in a store or classroom, or even at my computer (I have 4 boys, 2 of them not school aged yet and I stay at home to raise them) so sites like yours are now my lifeblood. Everyone else seems to have a grand opinion on a brand of oil and says the others are no good. It is so hard to decipher some of this stuff. It is awesome to have someone give the truth about different brands, and their claims. All the best to you, and thank you so much again from the bottom of this Mama’s overflowing heart!!!!
Sleep deficiency may start suddenly or may slowly become a habit over time. On a day-to-day basis, sleep deficiency can affect learning, memory recall, decision making, the ability to deal with change, and how we express our emotions or behaviors. Chronic sleep deficiency can increase the risk of certain health problems, such as obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke.1
Roman Chamomile is an ancient herb that can help with your sleeplessness caused from chronic stress, headaches or nervous disorders. It is a great choice to help you relax and prepare for sleep. Chamomile can also aid the efficiency of your digestive function, making this oil especially handy when suspecting that your sleeplessness might also have a relation to some digestive problems. Combined with Lavender above, Roman Chamomile Oil is a powerful and effective choice of a natural sleep aid treatment.
Hypnotic use has been associated with a 35% increase in developing cancer, and patients receiving hypnotics are more than 4 times likely to die than people who are not on the drugs. It appears that the dosage plays a key role, but “even patients prescribed fewer than 18 hypnotic doses per year experienced increased mortality, with greater mortality associated with greater dosage prescribed.” (3)

Glad to hear you’re finding the info helpful. I’ve never heard of the Majestic Pure brand before so I can’t comment on how strong it is. I always look for EOs from brands I know and trust that are high-quality, pure oils. If you can’t smell your blend well once it’s added to your alcohol, it could be that your dilution rate is off. I’m not sure. If you’re looking for a good company with a lot of oil choices, be sure to check out Edens Garden essential oils. They offer pure EOs, and they carry a ton of scents!
I have been reading your blog now for a few months and I really respect your advice and ideas. I also signed up for your “better listening” email series and have been learning a ton and working on implementing your advice with my 21 month & 3 1/2 year olds. They are responding well and I am looking particularly forward to working through these strategies with my youngest. He is as sharp as a tack and just coming into his own now. These tools are great and it’s awesome to have been equipped with  them right as he’s coming into the defiance stage. I feel much more confident in my ability to manage the challenges of this stage now. Thank you!
Hey Gabriela! I can’t speak from experience here because I’ve never made my own candles, but I too have heard that essential oils don’t work as well as fragrance oils in candles. No matter, I’d personally use them over fragrance oils. As far as the jasmine absolute… I don’t think you will get the scent you’re going for if you use any essential oil that’s already diluted in a carrier oil like the jojoba oil in this case. You need the concentrated oil. And yes, I’d still think the 30-50-20 rule would still apply if you want a rounded blend. Hope that helps… some!
Thanks for the comment. So are you saying that unless the oil is expensive, it’s probably not pure? I understand what you’re saying about the sandalwood oil. I’m sure that’s the case for a lot of oils. I know it’s that way with herbs. Some herbs you harvest the first year, some the second, and it even makes a difference when it comes to the part of the plant you use. I’m just wondering if there’s a way to really tell if one is pure… for the lay person of course. Also, where were you trained at? I’m not aware of many aromatherapy schools so it’s always nice to hear of more.
This blending ratio doesn’t have a drop limit, but keep in mind that you want your blend to stay small so you don’t waste your oils (in case you don’t like it). You’ll be keeping track of your essential oils and drops on paper. This blending ratio works well with pure combinations (essential oils from one category) and mixed combinations (essential oils from complementary categories).
Getting a good night's sleep can sometimes feel as impossible and frustrating as trying to lick your elbow (if you've never tried it, I bet you just did — I see you, fam). There are a lot of different sleep aids on the market, but personally, I think adding some essential oils to your nightly routine is one of the best ways to get a good snooze. Many essential oils are specifically dedicated to helping you doze off, and combining some of these relaxing, fragrant substances into essential oil blends for sleep is a surefire way to reap all the bedtime benefits you're searching for.

You might be surprised to read the name of Sweet Orange essential oil (Citrus sinensis) in this list of essential oils for sleep, as most citrus oils have uplifting and energizing effects. You are right, they do! Citrus oils are very happy and bright oils, yet in the application for sleep, sweet orange helps relieve stress and brings balance to the mood, mind and body. It has a very pleasant aroma that appeals to a lot of people, and is able to generate calmness in situations of tension. I wouldn’t use sweet orange essential oil on its own for getting to sleep, but I would definitely add it to a sleep blend to help tie the blend together.


Hello! Loved the article. Very helpful! I just started using oils this past spring and got them through Young Living, however I can’t afford them and found Eden’s Garden is more reasonable for me. My question is can I blend the two brands together? I still have some YL oils left and was just going to replace the ones I’m out of with Eden’s Garden. I usually just diffuse them, but have made a cream for Hand, Foot, Mouth.
A little thing about me: I 💙 essential oils. I also love using my background in research to help people learn more about essential oils and all the wonderful ways they can be used. I share DIY recipes for natural cleaners that really work, non-toxic beauty solutions, and holistic wellness. My essential oil recipes, info, and tips have been viewed more than 20 million times. I've been featured on MindBodyGreen, Health & Natural Living, All Natural Ideas, This Natural Home, Natural Living Ideas, and Passion for Savings.
I really enjoyed this post and then I read you’re bio at the end and I liked it even more. I’m about 5 years late in reading it but better late than never. I am new to blending and have been reading whatever I can about techniques and I think your input has really helped me embrace the fact that this is as much of an art as it is a science and although there is a lot of chemistry involved, intuition and patience play a big role in it too. It’s really helped me prioritize what I want to accomplish and this article even helped make blending a little less intimidating/overwhelming. Thank you again for your help and God bless!!
Lavender is said to ease tension and induce relaxation. In studies done by Britain’s University of Southampton, they found that participants who diffused lavender oil at night ranked their sleep an average of 20% better than the placebo group. Newer research done by Wesleyan University confirms these findings. When combined with roman chamomile it delivers a knock-out punch for insomnia.
Hi Rachael. Great questions! Those high dilution rates (20% and 10%) are just so you can smell your EO blend mixed with a carrier oil to see if you like it or not. All carrier oils smell different, and they can effect how your blend smells in the end. That’s why I recommend testing your EO blends in different carrier oils at different dilutions to see what you like best. And, because the smells of EO blends change depending on what they’re mixed with, it’s always a good idea to test them in small batches before making bigger batches (hence using drops and not teaspoons or ounces!). Once you know what you like, you can then move on to making larger amounts of preblended oils (EO blend + carrier oil) for skin application using a lower dilution rate (3-5% for adults and anywhere from .25-1% for children depending on their age). This is my article on using EOs for children safely. There is a lot of different opinions on using EOs for kids. Since I’m not a trained aromatherapist, I tend to take the safe route with it comes to EOs. Hope this helps answer your questions a bit!! PS. Just for the record, higher dilution rates are often used in bath products (body wash, shampoo, shave creams, etc.) as they don’t sit on the skin, but are washed off fairly quickly. This decreases the amount of EO absorption you would have, therefore, higher percentages of EOs can go in those products so they smell stronger.
ROSE and GERANIUM. These two essential oils have similar floral scents, and both have been shown to reduce stress and anxiety, on their own and in combination with other essential oils. Some sleep experts recommend valerian as an essential oil for sleep aromatherapy. Valerian taken as a supplement can be highly beneficial for sleep. I wrote about valerian’s benefits for sleep and stress, here. But the smell of valerian is highly stinky! I recommend trying geranium or rose instead.
Hey Gabriela! I can’t speak from experience here because I’ve never made my own candles, but I too have heard that essential oils don’t work as well as fragrance oils in candles. No matter, I’d personally use them over fragrance oils. As far as the jasmine absolute… I don’t think you will get the scent you’re going for if you use any essential oil that’s already diluted in a carrier oil like the jojoba oil in this case. You need the concentrated oil. And yes, I’d still think the 30-50-20 rule would still apply if you want a rounded blend. Hope that helps… some!
You could try using equal amounts of each and see how it turns out for you. The problem I find with that is that the stronger scents will tend to overpower the lighter scents because too much was used. For example if you were to blend lavender and patchouli and you used equal amounts, your blend is probably not going to smell as good as if you used more lavender than patchouli because patchouli is very strong and it can smell bad if too much is used.
Here in California, where my family and I live, we’re treated to a bountiful, year-round explosion of plant life. The bright citrus trees, the blooming roses, the clusters of flowering lavender plants all make for amazing sights—and scents. But you don’t have to live in Southern California to enjoy these fragrant smells, or to get the benefits that they can deliver to sleep and mood.  
It’s important to note: sandalwood has also been shown to increase wakefulness and alertness, even when it is also triggering physical relaxation. Everyone reacts to scents differently. Sandalwood may deliver sleep benefits for some people, while for others, it may promote wakeful, attentive relaxation. If that’s the case for you, sandalwood isn’t right for nighttime, but you can use it during the day to feel relaxed and alert.
Tracey Black, founder and CEO of Don’t Mess with Mama, started blogging to share her family’s gluten-free and natural living journey. At DontMesswithMama.com, she shares how simple it can be to live a more natural lifestyle. Here you’ll find gluten-free recipes, green cleaning tips, DIY and homemade tutorials, minimalism tips and so much more! Tracey is also the author of the books Natural Beauty Made Simple, Instant Pot Recipes Made Simple and Gluten-Free Recipes Your Family Will Love.
This reason alone makes it important to choose the right diffuser and my advice to reap all of the benefits of essential oils is to stick with a cold-air, nebulizing or ultrasonic diffuser. I DO keep a little plugin diffuser in my car, although that one does heat up, so I know I’m getting the calming benefits of the scents, but I may be losing out on some of the other aromatherapy effects. 
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