One notable benefit of sandalwood essential oil is its natural sleep aid properties. In a recent clinical trial, sandalwood essential oil was noted to have a depressive effect on the central nervous system, which helped promote relaxation and sleep. Sandalwood is one of the most popular essential oils for sleep aid remedies and one of the best essential oils for insomnia.
Apply to the body directly. Some people find it soothing to apply essential oils to pressure points, like the wrists or behind the ears, or use oils to give themselves a light self-massage. (Massage for–or from–your bed partners work great, too!) Essential oils in undiluted form are highly concentrated and intense, and can irritate your skin. DO NOT APPLY undiluted essential oil to your skin. If you’re planning to use essential oils topically on your body, be sure you’re buying an already diluted oil—a mixture of the fragrant essential oil of your choice and a carrier oil (often a vegetable oil).
I’m a big proponent of using natural, mind-body therapies to create better sleep, both by helping sleep directly and by relieving stress, anxiety, low mood, and physical discomfort. The practice of aromatherapy can do all these things. Essential oils have been used for centuries to promote relaxation and mental and physical wellness. Today, these same oils are increasingly being studied by scientists in search of a more rigorous, specific understanding of their benefits to sleep and health.
In the United States alone, more than 40 million people suffer from chronic sleep disorders, and another 20 million suffer from acute sleep problems. These disorders can range from chronic insomnia to daytime sleepiness, restless leg syndrome, and various other sleep problems related to substance abuse, anxiety, depression, medication interactions and chemical imbalances. Pharmaceuticals prescribed for sleep disorders can often have extreme side effects and leave people feeling sluggish throughout their day. Experts recommend 7-9 hours of uninterrupted sleep per day for adults, yet in our fast-paced and demanding modern world, this can be very difficult.
According to a study published by Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, cancer patients have a particularly tough go at getting good sleep. Subjects were given aromatherapy over a 13-week period of time. The effects were very beneficial, producing more sleep for the patients. In fact, over 90 percent said they would continue use of the blend that included bergamot, lavender, sandalwood, frankincense and mandarin. (1) 
It really depends on the size of your diffuser. The combination, I think is based on your preference, but the total drops should be 6-7 for a 100 – 150 ml water tank, and 8-10 for a 200-350 ml tank. I also have a 750 ml diffuser/vaporizer I haven’t used yet, so I am thinking I would use 15-20 drops in that. I would start on the lighter side, and then increase to the higher recommended amount based on your tolerance. I began using EOs starting with diffusing lavender and a Good Nite blend last summer to help me sleep, as I couldn’t fall asleep and stay asleep. Now I am educating myself in all the benefits, and am slowly becoming addicted.
Essential oils can act by triggering the central nervous system and circulatory system to promote sleep in the body. To test these effects, an increasing amount of scientific studies have been conducted to evaluate their effectiveness on humans. The following are considered the best essential oils for sleep due to their sedative, calming or stress-reducing properties.
Because vetiver essential oil is distilled from the roots of the plant, it smells very rich and earthy. This is another great oil to try for sleep because it is psychologically grounding, calming and stabilizing. It can take you awhile to get used to the smell, so if you are a vetiver newbie, you can try mixing it with a floral or citrus oil, such as lavender or bergamot.
Sleep is as essential to your health as food and water. Yet we don’t often make getting a good night’s sleep enough of a priority. We even make it harder to sleep properly by incorporating things like caffeinated drinks, or huge amounts of screen time into our lives, both of which affect our brain chemistry and sleep cycles. Not to mention what stress and late nights can do to a body.

I found you while searching for information about essential oils. You have a really neat site and with tons of great and valuable information that helps me a lot. I have been using essential oils for some time now, specially for cleaning around my home and for room sprays . I am now making soy candles but I am using essential oils instead of fragrance oils, even though some says that essential oils doesn’t have a very good scent throw in candles. My question for you is, Can I use jasmine absolute in jojoba oil for scent my wax? And what will be the ratio for blending in 6oz of soy wax? Would the 30-50-20 rule apply the same for blending essential oils for candles?


Well, aromatherapy (or smelling essential oils) can do the same thing. They can help to support your mood and emotions. Think about how you feel when you smell a fresh-cut lemon or how about Lavender from the garden? Maybe energized from the lemon and relaxed with the lavender? Well, it’s no surprise. Essential oils are highly concentrated aromatic essences of those plants. That’s why smelling them is a really effective way of using essential oils. This is called aromatic use. Be sure to check out How to Support Emotions with Essential Oils.
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Hi – My family and I have been using essential oils for 10 years. We are 100% believers in their healing powers. I turned essential oils into a business about 4 years ago, due to my first hand knowledge of their amazing properties. To address some of the diffuser comments and questions above, you do not need a nebulizing diffuser to enjoy the benefits of oils. Ultrasonic diffusers that use water do an excellent job of transporting oils in the air. And, though nebulizers provide an intense essential oil experience, they take a lot of oil to run and they run through that oil quickly. Now, if you’re water source is compromised, this can degrade the oil. We have, however, made a push to provide all types of diffuser options to our customers. If you don’t like plastic diffusers, we have ceramic. If you don’t want ceramic, we have glass. If you don’t want ultrasonic with water, we have nebulizing diffusers. If anyone has any questions, please reach out. We’ve been using oils daily, for a long time. Happy to answer any question or address concerns the best I can. Thanks

Shower Steamers – This is a really great method to use when you NEED to calm the kiddos down before bed. As a mother, I understand this feeling! I find that a shower or bath tends to help relax and calm a child down. On those really crazy days, just add a couple drops to a shower steamer and drop in the tub to let it diffuse in the heated shower. It will help calm and soothe your child before bed, helping them to fall asleep faster. You can also add a couple drops to the Epsom salt for a nice bedtime bath!

For toddlers, using essential oils may be an alternative approach for sleep issues or deprivation. The most commonly used essential oils include chamomile, lavender, eucalyptus, and lemongrass. Users should obtain doctors approval prior to using any essential oils for toddler sleep issues. Talk to your doctor about proper dosing and the best method of delivery for your child.
Aaaah… sleep! Such a popular and much talked about topic. Lack of sleep can be harmful to any individual’s health and well-being, while adequate sleep assists in the retention of stamina and provision of energy that fuels you to function all day long. With an increase in everyday stress levels, hypertension, and the overall pace of life, individuals are resorting to all sorts of things to help improve sleep.
Cedarwood essential oil has a warm, woody scent that can help promote a good night of rest. It’s both grounding and calming, which enhances that relaxation mode. It relieves tension by producing serotonin that causes the release of melatonin. Melatonin helps induce a sedative state that can offer restorative sleep and give you a refreshed feeling in the morning. (3) 
A quick thank you while my 15 month old son is sleeping. So glad I found you on my motherhood journey.  After 17 years of being childless (but envisioning a future life with a calm and peaceful soul), I gave birth at 43 to a larger-than-life, highly spirited, vocal baby whom I couldn’t relate to. Everyday has been a challenge to meet his ever increasing needs.  Your guidance has helped organize me and prepare me mentally more than any other blog or support group, thank you.

I really enjoyed this post and then I read you’re bio at the end and I liked it even more. I’m about 5 years late in reading it but better late than never. I am new to blending and have been reading whatever I can about techniques and I think your input has really helped me embrace the fact that this is as much of an art as it is a science and although there is a lot of chemistry involved, intuition and patience play a big role in it too. It’s really helped me prioritize what I want to accomplish and this article even helped make blending a little less intimidating/overwhelming. Thank you again for your help and God bless!!


Just because these two brands frequently recommend taking essential oils internally doesn’t mean their brands can be and others can’t. It just means they give unsafe advice that is contrary to what any real aromatherapist would advise. People have gotten seriously hurt by following this advice. The International Association of Holistic Aromatherapist says that essential oils should never be taken internally unless you are advised to do so by a clinical aromatherapist who has appropriate training in anatomy, physiology, chemistry, etc. This has nothing to do with oil purity and everything to do with the fact that essential oils are very powerful.
To me, they all seem very distinct with stimulating and clarifying properties. You have strong, medicinal or minty type oils like rosemary, peppermint, eucalyptus, you have some woodsy oils such as pine and cypress, and then you have some citrus oils such as grapefruit, lemon, bergamot, neroli. You even have some floral oils like rose, geranium, and ylang ylang and some spicier oils such as black pepper, nutmeg, and ginger.

Would I blend a properly diluted (in carrier oil) say…Eucalyptus, mixture in with my Neem mixture or simply add some drops of Eucalyptus to the Neem mixture with no additional carrier oil? This probably sounds very stupid, but I am a little confused since there is generally a finite number of drops you should use per ounce/ml of carrier oil. Does my question this make sense?
Essential oils can act by triggering the central nervous system and circulatory system to promote sleep in the body. To test these effects, an increasing amount of scientific studies have been conducted to evaluate their effectiveness on humans. The following are considered the best essential oils for sleep due to their sedative, calming or stress-reducing properties.
The whole article was really helpful! My girlfriend and I are currently trying to find ways to raise money so she can fund a research aimed to study and protect a species that is now endangered in our country but it has been very difficult as many people don’t feel concerned. We’re now trying to find other ideas and she came up with the idea of making candles. Mixing essential oils can be quite difficult when you’re not sure if they would blend together well, especially when you don’t already have them on hand… Our idea is to create candles made from organic soy wax, that could also double as massage candles (she already made some and it does wonders for the skin), and blend oils with natural scents that remind people of different environments where they can also find endangered species, since we plan on donating a percentage of the money to different non-profit organizations. We had some ideas but don’t know much about essential oils, and this article has been SO helpful and is already helping us with our list of mixes so we can create wonderful scents. All these tips will also help us get to a slightly less ”amateur” result so we can offer products with different depths and scents, that last longer. Thanks a lot!
Hi there – thanks for a great article, I am just starting out in using essential oils and this has been really helpful. I have just made my first batch up today of blends (Relaxing: lavender, bergamot & rosewood. And insect repellent: lavender, peppermint & rosewood. I don’t have a large stock on EO’s yet so limited to what I can use at the moment). However I am little stumped regarding the dilution rates? In your article you gave a 10% and 20%, are these okay to use on the skin? I read on another page that a 2% dilution should be used on the skin? So more like 1 drop of essential oil blend to 4 tsp of carrier oil. Which is correct please? Also, what dilution rate would you recommend on young children? Thanks 🙂
In fact, the benefits of diffusing essential oils into the air are one of the main reasons I’m loving these essential oil recipes. When you apply heat to essential oils, many studies show it can actually denature many of the most important chemicals and compounds, so you are essentially just diffusing the oils for scent, and not for the beneficial aspects.
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