Love the listening course and the routine card printables and listening workbook so far. Listening has been our biggest challenge lately. My son was flat out just ignoring our voices. I started implementing the strategies yesterday and it was such smooth sailing all day long. Not only that, but the empathy statements and “turning a no into a yes” actually had my three year old saying “okay, mom” happily and complying right away without fighting or tears, by the end of the day! And it has worked wonders for my mood and frustration level when the arguing and tears are not averted. Trying to keep the 5:1 ratio has made me realize what a bad habit I’d fallen into. It becomes so easy to give commands and warnings and issue no’s, that you forget to take notice of the good! I feel so much better, as a mom, now that I’m intentionally encouraging my kid for his strengths. Thank you so much!

You can definitley combine both, Elizabeth. The ratio is totally your choice depending on what helps you. One thing you could do would be to make two separate personal inhalers (one with rosemary and one with lavender) and take a few deep breaths of the rosemary as needed, then, if you start feeling too anxious, start using the lavender one to calm you a bit. Maybe try it BEFORE you take a test… like during a study session, to see if it helps or not. Best of luck in your studies… I remember a lot of late nights getting ready for those big tests!
Sleep is one of the most important and restorative processes for our body, and when we don’t get a proper amount of restful, uninterrupted sleep that we need, there are quite a few negative effects on our overall health. Fortunately, there are many excellent essential oils for sleep, which can leave you refreshed, rested and ready to face the world.
Many essential oils will fit into more than one category. You can blend them with other essential oils that blend well with the categories they fit in, or you can smell the essential oil and decide which category you think it best fits in. Blending is more about what you think rather than a list of hard and fast rules. I’m not sure if there’s a book on blending or not. I know you can learn more about it by doing it. I also know that some aromatherapists and perfumists teach courses on it so you may want to Google that.
From my understanding and research (and I’m not an aromatherapist), all essential oils have particular qualities of smell as far as which are smelled first and which last a short while vs. a long while. This is why you blend them together based on those qualities (which are categorized as “notes”) so you can smell each oil among the others and have your blend last longer. Do you have to follow that rule? Of course not. If you’re making blends that are going to smell great and last a good while, should you follow that rule? Probably… I don’t know for sure as I’m not an aromatherapist and I don’t make perfume blends often.
Asking these questions can help you to know whether you’re finding accurate information that you can trust or not. There are plenty of websites out there dedicated to teaching others about essential oils and aromatherapy whether it’s a school for essential oil studies, a company that sells essential oils, or a blogger who loves to share what she’s learning about them (and references her sources!).

Hi there! I’m new (well several months in, but “new” in the grand scheme of things) to the world of EO’S but have learned a lot along the way. Thank you for writing about making blends; I hope to whip some up once I add a couple more EO’s to my stash. I did feel compelled to write & express my concern towards your “10 Must Have..” chart. I don’t know about all of the oils, but I do know that peppermint and eucalyptus especially are no-no’s for young children (eucalyptus can cause respiratory issues). And since there are several varieties of eucalyptus out there varying in strength, a parent could mistakenly purchase & use the strongest one on a too-young child! I do hope that this is taken in the manner it is written, with caring & concern!!
Oh, lavender essential oil is great, and I’d definitely consider it a go-to oil. It’s an easy one for beginners to use, it’s mostly safe, and it has a lot of different uses. I didn’t exclude it from the list for any particular reason. I just went through and tried to select oils with different notes so people would have a good variety of EO choices when making their blends. Hope that answers your question!

This makes smell unique among our senses. Information we take in from our other senses travels first to another region of the brain, the thalamus, which acts as a relay station, passing along sensory data to the other parts of the brain that produce our sensory perceptions. Only smell moves directly to the brain’s emotion and memory center. That’s why those memories you associate with the scent of garden roses, or banana bread baking in the oven, come on so quickly and so strongly.


Since I have asthma, dust mites are a problem. I use a mattress pad that can be easily removed and washed. Make sure all bedding is machine washable in hot water, as this kills the mites. I put my down comforter in a washable duvet, so it can be washed weekly with the other bedding. I’m sure a spray of tea tree oil on the bedding couldn’t hurt. I put eucalyptus in my eo diffuser in my bedroom. I keep dust attracting items in closets or drawers, exchanged my dry-clean only bedroom curtains for washable ones and got rid of the hard to clean blinds. For kids, no stuffed animals in the bedroom unless they are machine washable.
The great thing about these recipes, is that you can experiment and change them based on what you like! So if you start with the recipe, but find you need more, you can add in more! My diffusers are all mid-size and hold between 100-150 ml of water. These recipes are based on that size (most home diffusers are similar in size). You can still use these recipes with yours! If you find you need to add more oil since you’re adding more water, add in a few extra drops of each and see how that does for you. Sometimes in a large open space I find that I need to add in a little more myself. 😉 Hope that helps… have you tried any yet?? I’d love to hear which ones you like!

Loved your article. It helps me understand a bit more. I bought a bottle of pure patchouli oil recently. I have always loved the smell of patchouli. I was overwhelmed with how strong the smell was. I was wanting it for like and air freshener in my home, but way too strong to use alone. I have these goat milk soap that are scented patchouli and orange, which I just love. So I got the bright idea to mix my patchouli oil with orange oil. What I like to know do you think I should use a carrier oil like jojoba to tone the scent down if needs be? And will it change the scent at all?
Great points Angie. I really love the work Lea Harris is doing at LearningAboutEOs.com when she tests all the different oils and shows the results. Even the big companies are noticing and thanking her for doing that… including doTERRA and Young Living… which says a lot about the companies not minding other people testing their products because they have confidence in what they’re selling.
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