I’m so so sorry Diana, but I’m definitely not a perfumist. That blend sounds awesome… like something I’d definitely wear, but I’m no help. This article is a basis how to on how to blend… I don’t know enough about the smells of individual oils to be able to tell you what you’re missing and how much of each oil to use. You’ll just have to experiment and see or consult with someone who makes essential oil perfumes. Thanks!
There are quite a few essential oils that can help with the issues that pertain to sleepless nights. Some are great for calming the body down while others can help shut off the mind when it won't shut up. Not all essential oils are created equal! If you are using these for small children and babies, be sure to check out my post on Essential Oil Safety for Babies & Children. These are just some essential oils that you can use in a sleepytime blend:

I also really enjoyed your information on blending. When I first started blending oils I didn’t know much so I would muscle test which ones I needed to use and in what quantity. It’s interesting as I am learning more of the “science” behind it, and I go back to my blend recipes and see how it all played out with the top, middle, and base notes, all in the correct quantities. It’s actually really fun to see. I am enjoying learning more, which makes me realize how much I don’t know!! 🙂
Would I blend a properly diluted (in carrier oil) say…Eucalyptus, mixture in with my Neem mixture or simply add some drops of Eucalyptus to the Neem mixture with no additional carrier oil? This probably sounds very stupid, but I am a little confused since there is generally a finite number of drops you should use per ounce/ml of carrier oil. Does my question this make sense?
You could try using equal amounts of each and see how it turns out for you. The problem I find with that is that the stronger scents will tend to overpower the lighter scents because too much was used. For example if you were to blend lavender and patchouli and you used equal amounts, your blend is probably not going to smell as good as if you used more lavender than patchouli because patchouli is very strong and it can smell bad if too much is used.
Tabitha has been named Tampa Bay's most influential mommy blogger and is the writer behind FreshMommyBlog.com as well as hosts her own online cooking show, KitchenWise . She has made appearances on Daytime TV and has been featured multiple times in print and online magazines, other blogs and websites. She's a sought after speaker and has represented many large brands as spokesmodel, including Mitsubishi Motors. In her own words, "I want to live authentically with as much heart as I can muster, loving those around me to their fullest potential and biggest dreams. Yes, maybe a little dramatic, but living fiercely is part of my make up."
Hi there – thanks for a great article, I am just starting out in using essential oils and this has been really helpful. I have just made my first batch up today of blends (Relaxing: lavender, bergamot & rosewood. And insect repellent: lavender, peppermint & rosewood. I don’t have a large stock on EO’s yet so limited to what I can use at the moment). However I am little stumped regarding the dilution rates? In your article you gave a 10% and 20%, are these okay to use on the skin? I read on another page that a 2% dilution should be used on the skin? So more like 1 drop of essential oil blend to 4 tsp of carrier oil. Which is correct please? Also, what dilution rate would you recommend on young children? Thanks 🙂

Apply to the body directly. Some people find it soothing to apply essential oils to pressure points, like the wrists or behind the ears, or use oils to give themselves a light self-massage. (Massage for–or from–your bed partners work great, too!) Essential oils in undiluted form are highly concentrated and intense, and can irritate your skin. DO NOT APPLY undiluted essential oil to your skin. If you’re planning to use essential oils topically on your body, be sure you’re buying an already diluted oil—a mixture of the fragrant essential oil of your choice and a carrier oil (often a vegetable oil).


I’ve long been a candle addict. There’s nothing like lit candles, good music and the ambiance it creates for a relaxing evening at home. And while I haven’t completely kicked the candle habit to the curb, I’m being wiser about my choices for the more occasional lighting of only soy or beeswax while avoiding the paraffin (toxin releasing) candles.  But an even better option, which I pretty much use all day long while at home are our essential oil diffusers. Definitely a new kind of addiction. Another plus? It’s elicited more, “Wow, it smells great in here,” comments from guests than my mix of candles ever did!


When it comes to blending essential oils, it’s recommended to start with three essential oils in a blend until you’re familiar and comfortable with the blending process. From there you can go up to five essential oils in a blend and then up to nine. Rarely will you find more than nine aromas in one blend as that is typically reserved for perfumists!
Roman Chamomile is an ancient herb that can help with your sleeplessness caused from chronic stress, headaches or nervous disorders. It is a great choice to help you relax and prepare for sleep. Chamomile can also aid the efficiency of your digestive function, making this oil especially handy when suspecting that your sleeplessness might also have a relation to some digestive problems. Combined with Lavender above, Roman Chamomile Oil is a powerful and effective choice of a natural sleep aid treatment.
From my understanding, the total number of oils is not the safety concern, it’s the total amount of EOs used (the final dilution) that matters. While there are various dilution guidelines, these are the most recent recommendations from aromatherapists I respect. Products that cover large portions of your body and sit on the skin for long periods of time (like lotions) need to be diluted more (1-2% depending on the strength of the EOs used). Products that don’t sit on the skin for long (like body washes) can be diluted less (around 5-10%, again depending on the strength of the oils used). Products that cover larger portions of skin (salve with EOs) should be more diluted (2-3%) compared to products that cover smaller portions of skin (roller bottle spot applications) which can be less diluted (5%). Age and health will also be a factor in dilution amounts. Children and the elderly need their EOs to be diluted more as their livers are slower at metabolizing EO chemicals than a healthy teenager or adult liver. Dilution also depends on the strength of the oil. For example, cinnamon bark requires more dilution than cinnamon leaf. Does this make sense? A lot of EO books (like this one) give recommendations and guidelines for this sort of thing.

What would your recommendation be when making blends not for scent but for therapeutic use such as in skincare? I want to try adding essential oils to my skin care routine, specifically adding them to a basic, existing lotion. I’ve done my research and have a bunch of oils selected that are supposed to be helpful for skin care, but I’m not sure where to go from here! Do I figure out the dilution % for each one and add it to the lotion? Or do I need to only add a maximum amount of essential oils in total? Is there a maximum number of oils you can use at one time or a maximum percentage of oils in total that can be safely added? Are there oils that react badly to each other? Sorry so many questions, but I’ve been searching a lot and can’t seem to find any answers!
When it comes to blending essential oils, it’s recommended to start with three essential oils in a blend until you’re familiar and comfortable with the blending process. From there you can go up to five essential oils in a blend and then up to nine. Rarely will you find more than nine aromas in one blend as that is typically reserved for perfumists!
Hi – My family and I have been using essential oils for 10 years. We are 100% believers in their healing powers. I turned essential oils into a business about 4 years ago, due to my first hand knowledge of their amazing properties. To address some of the diffuser comments and questions above, you do not need a nebulizing diffuser to enjoy the benefits of oils. Ultrasonic diffusers that use water do an excellent job of transporting oils in the air. And, though nebulizers provide an intense essential oil experience, they take a lot of oil to run and they run through that oil quickly. Now, if you’re water source is compromised, this can degrade the oil. We have, however, made a push to provide all types of diffuser options to our customers. If you don’t like plastic diffusers, we have ceramic. If you don’t want ceramic, we have glass. If you don’t want ultrasonic with water, we have nebulizing diffusers. If anyone has any questions, please reach out. We’ve been using oils daily, for a long time. Happy to answer any question or address concerns the best I can. Thanks
Get on a sleep schedule and go to bed before midnight – Some research suggests that every hour of sleep prior to 12 am is equal to 2 hours after. It's really important that you start going to bed at a normal hour, as your body adjusts, you will begin to wake up earlier naturally, without feeling so groggy, and you'll also begin to become tired as evening approaches.
As far as the spruce goes though, I’d personally leave it out. I don’t know a lot about it except that it contains thujone which can be toxic to the body in large doses and cause nervous system issues. Since you’re using a lot of this oil over a long period of time… I’d just leave it out. The only respiratory benefit I found on it was to reduce coughing and you already have plenty of other oils in your blend that will also do that. So to me, it’s better to leave it out… especially for a young child.
One of the things I did for my kids when they were younger and had a hard time going to sleep was put one to two drops of either chamomile or lavender eo in the palm of my hands, rub them together, then rub them all over the kids pillowcase and sheets. It worked like magic! The oils would wear off through the night and by morning the kids were refreshed and in a great mood.
I use Cinnamon Bark from Spark Naturals. I’m sure you could use either one, that is just the one I use. Also, make sure to get a good quality oil since diffusing the oil gets the particles and benefits into the air in your home and air you breathe. I also love to change up what I diffuse throughout the day! You can either use more than one diffuser so that you can let it run until the water/oil is gone, or just try not filling it all the way and using less oil so it can run for a shorter amount of time. That way, you’re not dumping out anything to change what oils you use. I usually let my diffusers run until what I have in the “tank” is gone and then I change what blend I’m using 🙂

It is even simple to put together the massage oil blend to do it.  Giving yourself a neck and shoulder massage doesn’t have to be complicated either.  You simply apply a small amount of the massage oil to your neck and gently massage it in.  You can learn how to give a more involved self-massage by watching great tutorials on YouTube, but what matters is mostly getting the essential oils on your skin.


What would your recommendation be when making blends not for scent but for therapeutic use such as in skincare? I want to try adding essential oils to my skin care routine, specifically adding them to a basic, existing lotion. I’ve done my research and have a bunch of oils selected that are supposed to be helpful for skin care, but I’m not sure where to go from here! Do I figure out the dilution % for each one and add it to the lotion? Or do I need to only add a maximum amount of essential oils in total? Is there a maximum number of oils you can use at one time or a maximum percentage of oils in total that can be safely added? Are there oils that react badly to each other? Sorry so many questions, but I’ve been searching a lot and can’t seem to find any answers!
I use Cinnamon Bark from Spark Naturals. I’m sure you could use either one, that is just the one I use. Also, make sure to get a good quality oil since diffusing the oil gets the particles and benefits into the air in your home and air you breathe. I also love to change up what I diffuse throughout the day! You can either use more than one diffuser so that you can let it run until the water/oil is gone, or just try not filling it all the way and using less oil so it can run for a shorter amount of time. That way, you’re not dumping out anything to change what oils you use. I usually let my diffusers run until what I have in the “tank” is gone and then I change what blend I’m using 🙂
Sure Dorie. So after you’ve got your essential oil blend, you can diffuse it at home to get it into the air or you can just open the bottle and sniff it from time to time. That’s two great ways to use EOs safely… assuming the oils are appropriate for your son’s age. For school, the best bet is to dilute the EO blend in a carrier oil (like jojoba oil) and put it in a 1 oz. glass bottle with a roller top. That way it’s easy to apply. Simply rub a little bit on the insides of the wrist, behind the ears, the temple area, or the neck and you should be able to absorb it into the skin slowly as well as smell it for a bit. Hope that helps!! Let me know if you have any other questions!
They make jewelry now that can hold oils…like lava stones, which you can put a few drops right on…and, several different types, depending on how many stones…..or a necklace that holds stones, or a little piece of felt, or a little cloth ball. The jewelry has a spot that opens and closes, so you can add whichever method, and scent you choose. My son wears a lava stone bracelet for his anxiety, and then some veviter to help his ADD. I have several pieces that I use for myself. Google them, or look on Ebay or Amazon.
I’m loving receiving your emails. What strategies you suggest are common knowledge, but having the time to sit back and think about them is another thing.  I have used the 2 choices a lot this week. It’s amazing how it can work. Our power struggles have decreased, kids have been getting along together better. I know it has been only a week, but it feels like a massive change. I wish I had have signed up for emails 3 weeks ago and used the strategies on their school holidays lol.

As far as how much to use of each goes, that’s up to you. That’s the magic of blending. I understand that they’re expensive oils so you don’t wanna play around too much with different blends, but there are really a lot of different options. You could try equal drops of each or if you really like the smell of one over the others use more of it. Hope this helps get you started! Best of luck!
For a more citrus-y scent that will calm any strong emotions you might be feeling before bed, try combining four drops of bergamot, four drops of frankincense, and two drops of vetiver. Adding frankincense into the mix will soothe any wired thoughts in your brain that might be keeping you awake, relieve any bodily tension you're unknowingly holding on to, and squash any nighttime insomnia that's interrupting your beauty sleep.

You might be surprised to read the name of Sweet Orange essential oil (Citrus sinensis) in this list of essential oils for sleep, as most citrus oils have uplifting and energizing effects. You are right, they do! Citrus oils are very happy and bright oils, yet in the application for sleep, sweet orange helps relieve stress and brings balance to the mood, mind and body. It has a very pleasant aroma that appeals to a lot of people, and is able to generate calmness in situations of tension. I wouldn’t use sweet orange essential oil on its own for getting to sleep, but I would definitely add it to a sleep blend to help tie the blend together.
CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
This makes smell unique among our senses. Information we take in from our other senses travels first to another region of the brain, the thalamus, which acts as a relay station, passing along sensory data to the other parts of the brain that produce our sensory perceptions. Only smell moves directly to the brain’s emotion and memory center. That’s why those memories you associate with the scent of garden roses, or banana bread baking in the oven, come on so quickly and so strongly.
It said that the reason companies like Young Living and doTERRA are so expensive is because they claim their oils can be used internally, and that means they must carry insurance in case they’re sued based on those claims… which makes their oils more expensive. Smaller companies usually can’t afford that type of insurance so they can’t make those claims about internal use, but it does mean that their oils can be priced cheaper even though the quality is the same as the bigger companies.
Dear Tabitha thank you for these great recipes. I just have one question its a bit off topic. I want to be able to use the best possible unit to diffuse the Essential Oils. Which one would you recommend is best? I have been using ultrasonic ones but am thinking of about upgrading to either a vaporizer from http://www.herbalizer.com/ or a nebulizer from https://richaroms.com ? What I want to know is which technique of diffusion breaks the particles down to a state where our bodies can absorb them better?
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